codex

(redirected from codices)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

codex

Obsolete a legal code

Codex

 

a form of the book, consisting originally of sheets of parchment or papyrus, and since the late Middle Ages of paper, folded in half and sewn along the fold; groups of sheets were then fastened together on one side. The codex was first widely used in the eastern Roman provinces in the first centuries A.D., replacing tablets and scrolls, and about the sixth century A.D. it became the basic type of book. The adoption of the codex led to the development of binding and of the page and its decoration (page miniature, headpiece). Modern books retain the form of the codex.

References in periodicals archive ?
These codices are painted pictorial manuscripts that survived the Spanish conquest of Mexico.
11 and the Trent Codices, a group of seven sources dating c.
The four codices published here represent a small portion of the volumes of drawings by Alberto and his sons listed in the diaries.
Almost half of the manuscripts (280 codices representing 275 individual compositions which correspond to 265 entries) are Arabic manuscripts covering the whole spectrum of Islamic disciplines.
Through a study of the controversy, we can see how Erasmus's rereading of the Greek codices and philological critique of the Vulgate had implications that were "the seeds of a religious revolution" (10).
The core of his evidence comprises 71 school-books in 49 modern codices, which Gehl carefully describes in the book's appendix.
Hurtado examines manuscripts used by early Christians as artifacts that reveal aspects of early Christianity: the earliest texts of Old and New Testament; the preference for the codex over the scroll; the use of nomina sacra (abbreviations for sacred names); the staurogram (the chi-rho as the earliest symbol of the cross), and the size of codices.
They have spent several decades studying the Maya codices and here provide an authoritative reference (it's hefty--measuring 19.
They slaughtered the Jews but carefully preserved the two codices because they knew that the Karaite community in Cairo would ransom them.
However, for some hymn codices one finds the beginning lines for all the texts but ending lines only for selected texts (with no discernible indication of why texts would include or omit the final lines).