coefficient of expansion


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coefficient of expansion

[¦kō·ə′fish·ənt əv ik′span·shən]

coefficient of expansion

The change in dimension of a material per unit of dimension per degree change in temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
The addition of an anti-vein agent changes the thermal coefficient of expansion of the core sand to allow the veining defect to improve or not exist.
"It has a very low coefficient of expansion," says Griffith.
Remember, the material often also acts as an underfill, cushioning the effects of thermal coefficient of expansion (TCE) differentials.
Thermoplastics have a higher coefficient of expansion than thermoset materials enabling a greater incidence of leakage due to the expansion and contraction that they allow.
Briley's general manager, Chuck Webb, told me that the company's thin-wall VX series of tubes that are installed in older shotguns are constructed of steel that "has a zero coefficient of expansion." In other words, because the extra-tough steel from which XV-series chokes are made does nor expand, even tight, full-choke models can be used in the traditional position within the muzzle.
It also has virtually the same coefficient of expansion and contraction as carbon steel, making it the natural choice to return energy conservation to facilities by installing it over existing insulation systems.
CE17 has a matching coefficient of expansion to copper (17 ppm/[degrees]C) but is less than one third the weight and is easier to machine.
"What I like about Cool Power over any other machine that's compensating for the coefficient of expansion with a mathematical equation is that Cool Power is sending a coolant through the machine at all times, keeping it at a constant temperature, so you don't see the heat expansion typically associated with other machines," says Veltri.
The agency said the thermal coefficient of expansion (T-coeff), the rate at which concrete contracts and expands as temperature changes, is a critical factor in pavement design.
By heating the fixture and sample, usually a few degrees, a temperature at which loading begins could be determined and the strain at room temperature could be calculated from the differential coefficient of expansion and the temperature difference.
Because of the difference in properties of the steel and the aluminum to which it is attached, joining is performed through the use of adhesives and mechanical fasteners rather than through welding (coefficient of expansion, for example, could be problematic).

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