coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, his thesis is correct: states do not have authority and lack the right to coerce, and society can get along perfectly well, if not better, without them.
Consequently, this Article suggests that an alternative criminal model should focus on the perpetrator's wrongful conduct, by examining various conditions indicating that he abused his supervisory power to coerce sex on his subordinate.
Taiwan first chooses whether to trade or not, after which China decides whether to exploit the trade relationship and coerce Taiwan.
US attempts to diplomatically coerce Somali warlords, Serbia over Kosovo, North Korean nuclear efforts, and Iraq on WMD disarmament were judged failures because in each case the target state felt that it had much more to lose than the damage that the application of limited American force would produce.
It is in the interest of the king to love rather than directly coerce his subjects because, freed from the legal burdens of political obligation, they will then begin to love him in return.
Thus, a lower C-factor might suffice to coerce if probabilistic, temporal, and epistemic imminence are high.
"He used to coerce me to touch him for a few minutes.
First published in 1989, this book by Hungarian-born libertarian philosopher and economist de Jasay aims to refute the existence of the classic public goods problem, which holds that contributions to shared benefits is collectively rational but individually irrational and that therefore a social contract must be fashioned with the power to coerce individual contributions to public goods.
It's compassionate to coerce individuals with eating disorders into treatment aimed at altering their potentially fatal pursuit of weight loss and thinness, comments psychiatrist Arnold E.
However, after meeting Hamdan, Swift "concluded the man wanted to fight any charges against him." He later told a Senate panel that he saw the tribunal's actions as "a clear attempt to coerce Mr.
Once suspects accept a narrowed option, inferred benefits coerce them, such as avoidance of a premeditated murder charge in favor of describing the crime as an accident.