coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
Yvonne Boyer, a former nurse who is Metis, co-authored a 2017 review of Indigenous women and coerced sterilization in Saskatoon.
He had originally claimed he had been coerced into giving statements and doing crime-scene walkthroughs, and that evidence collection by police was done under duress.
But the coerced apologies weren't seen as effective, especially by the 7 to 9-year-olds, Smith said.
The Nigerian men, aged between 24 and 25, and their 32-year-old countrywoman confined the resident in the flat where they forced him to undress and then coerced him to give his wallet that contained cash and bank cards.
If we take the Department of Works and Pensions, for example, the unemployed are coerced into signing up to a job search website and, contrary to any legal obligations entered into between the candidate and Monster Corporation (which operates Universal Job Match on behalf of the DWP) where the candidate is required to keep all personal data secret (including Government Gateway Number, email address, password), Job Centre staff coerce candidates into providing that data.
Lagman said he was not saying there was a trend of witnesses being coerced to testify against De Lima but a witness being forced to testify has been done before.
Vaughan Gething actually espouses this, within a back drop of Deemed (coerced) Consent.
White's House Bill 1648, which came before the committee, would make it a crime to coerce or force women to have abortions, and create a 72-hour waiting period for women who indicate they are being coerced or forced.
[16] Sexual behaviour measures (age at first foreplay, oral, anal and/or vaginal intercourse, age and gender of partner, coerced or voluntary) were collected from age 11 years at six subsequent time points (11-12 years, 13 years, 14 years, 15 years, 16 years and 17-18 years).
In addition to school enrollment and relationship status, numerous family structure and process variables may lead to an increase in females' risk for, or provide some protection against, coerced sex.
Taking the literature referred to above as our starting point we agree that coerced treatment challenges professional practice in relation to motivation, ethics, and collaboration.
Resolution 1945 (2013) requires a total ban on coerced sterilisation or castration, which are currently mainly directed against transgender people, Roma women and convicted sex offenders.