coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
The new Domestic Abuse Act criminalises psychological domestic abuse and coercive and controlling behaviour.
He also explained the effects of unilateral coercive measures on the education, transport, agriculture and basic services sectors, pointing out that the Syrian government, with the aim of finding development alternatives, adopted the strategy of "promoting South-South cooperation" and bolstering its commercials and economic relations with its partners in Iran, China and other friendly countries
For while female victims of domestic violence and coercive control are in the great majority, there exists a sizeable minority of male and non-binary victims.
"Coercive control underpins almost all abusive relationships, and Geoff has established himself at the centre of Yasmeen's life, and manipulated her in so many ways, controlling what she can and can't do.
Salamat was found guilty of engaging in coercive behaviour towards two of his daughters and his wife between 2015 and 2018.
The psychologist added: "On October 18, I concluded she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder and depressive disorder when she stabbed her husband, as well as alcohol use disorder and unresolved grief in the context of a history of extensive coercive control and recent physical assault.
Coercive Speaking on BBC Radio Scotland yesterday, David said: "It's a monumental control' the of violence moment and I think it pushes forward our understanding of domestic violence to really tackle it properly."
"I had strictly warned the commissioner against coercive measure but even then action was taken," he deplored and added this was unacceptable.
The bench also stopped NAB from taking coercive measures against the petitioner.
Malacanang on Tuesday dismissed accusations of 'vote buying' and using President Duterte's 'coercive influence' for the ratification of the Bangsamoro Organic Law (BOL).
In 2017, 15 people in the police force area were taken to court for the offence of controlling or coercive behaviour in an intimate or family relationship.