coercion

(redirected from coercive)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
..... Click the link for more information.
 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
..... Click the link for more information.
. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
..... Click the link for more information.
; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
The figures also found that 13% of reported cases of coercive or controlling behaviour lead to a charge, with 58% of cases dropped.
Coercive threats, in their definition, generally resolve around relatively minor disputes where nuclear usage would be overkill given the stakes, the international costs (via sanctions or military response) are likely too high to be worth a relatively small gain, and signaling nuclear resolve remains difficult.
In its comments on the recommendations and proposals contained in the report, the NHRC welcomed mechanisms to redress the victims of coercive measures and appreciated the considerable efforts made by the Special Rapporteur since taking office in May 2015.
The Chinese Government's Population and Family Planning Law, even as amended in 2015, and related regulations and practices at the central and Provincial levels, clearly constitute a "program of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization," and are an integral part of the comprehensive population-control program the Chinese Government advances.
It reiterated that the movement adopted such a stance in line with its principled position of condemning the promulgation and application of unilateral coercive measures against NAM member-states.
However, offenders may also be sentenced for other - and more serious - offences meaning they may not be prosecuted solely for the coercive control offence.
Scholars of international law and international relations explore sanctions as an instrument of coercive diplomacy.
In late November 2015, UN Special Rapporteur on the Negative Impact of the Unilateral Coercive Measures on the Enjoyment of Human Rights, Idriss Jazairy said that the comprehensive measures taken against Sudan "do not conform with the international developments in this regard".
The Government's new coercive or controlling behaviour offence will mean victims who experience extreme psychological and emotional abuse, can bring their perpetrators to justice, What does it cover?
Legislation that comes into force today paves the way for charges to be brought in domestic abuse cases where there is evidence of repeated "controlling or coercive behaviour" for the first time.
This came during his meeting Monday in his office at the Republican Palace, with the UN human rights special rapporteur, Iddris Al-Jazairi who is concerned with the negative impacts of the unilateral coercive measures imposed on the Sudan in the presence of the Justice Minister, Dr.
GENEVA, Nov 20 (KUNA) -- United Nations Special Rapporteur Idriss Jazairy will undertake an official visit to Sudan from 23 to 30 November to gather first-hand information on the negative impact on human rights of unilateral coercive measures imposed on the country by States or group of States.