coercion

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coercion,

in law, the unlawful act of compelling a person to do, or to abstain from doing, something by depriving him of the exercise of his free will, particularly by use or threat of physical or moral force. In many states of the United States, statutes declare a person guilty of a misdemeanor if he, by violence or injury to another's person, family, or property, or by depriving him of his clothing or any tool or implement, or by intimidating him with threatthreat,
in law, declaration of intent to injure another by doing an unlawful act, with a view to restraining his freedom of action. A threat is distinguishable from an assault, for an assault requires some physical act that appears likely to eventuate in violence, whereas a
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 of force, compels that other to perform some act that the other is not legally bound to perform. Coercion may involve other crimes, such as assaultassault,
in law, an attempt or threat, going beyond mere words, to use violence, with the intent and the apparent ability to do harm to another. If violent contact actually occurs, the offense of battery has been committed; modern criminal statutes often combine assault and
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. In the law of contracts, the use of unfair persuasion to procure an agreement is known as duressduress
, in law, actual or threatened violence or imprisonment, by reason of which a person is forced to enter into an agreement or to perform some other act against his will.
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; such a contract is void unless later ratified. At common law, one who commits a crime under coercion may be excused if he can show that the danger of death or great bodily harm was present and imminent. However, coercion is not a defense for the murder or attempted murder of an innocent third party.

coercion

the use of physical or nonphysical force, or the threat of force, to achieve a social or political purpose. See also VIOLENCE, POWER.

coercion

[kō′ər·shən]
(computer science)
A method employed by many programming languages to automatically convert one type of data to another.

coercion

References in periodicals archive ?
The collective perceptions among judges of the Guidelines as normatively legitimate, their definitions of the coerciveness of the Guidelines and the local circuit court climate, are all intimately related to contextual patterns of Guidelines conformity.
Bazin contrasted this aesthetic with the coerciveness of montage, which follows an interpretive schema determined by a director in advance.
(111) In short, there is no reason to think that in actual operation the declaratory judgment lacks the coerciveness of the injunction.
Dismantling "the homogeneity and coerciveness of nationalist rules and regulations" (129), Mendenhall describes transnational law as "the pluralistic order of various principles and rules from divergent customs, cultures, and communities that draws its lexicon from competing philosophical discourses and not from top-down, coercive commands of states or sovereigns" (131).
Indeed, it is the seriousness of the state and its coerciveness that brought them to the comedy hall in the first place.
Conventional command and control regulation, especially of EU origin, can never be ruled out as a classic instrument on top of the instrumental pyramid of coerciveness, but private regulation is also needed as this transnational regulation might be even more successful as it takes place in the shadow of public law (Van Gossum et al.
In support of this assertion was the coerciveness that both admissions and discharges be reported to local authorities within three days from the event, that applying for every type of mental illness, not merely to the dangerous ones.
Reiman constructs a "Marxian-Liberal original position" in which parties are aware of both the natural interest in liberty and of the coerciveness of private property.
The author argues that people of faith need to move beyond such "malfunctions of faith." Neither "coerciveness" nor "idleness" is adequate as a religious stance in relation to public life.
(78) The participants were asked to rate the coerciveness of various police interrogation tactics on a scale of 1 (not coercive at all) to 5 (extremely coercive).
At the opposite end of the coerciveness spectrum from criminal law--which can place a parent in prison is contract law, which enforces agreements freely entered into between private parties.
What she describes is something more nuanced, where there were varying degrees of coerciveness in a process where state authorities assumed roles traditionally taken by relatives in arranging marriage, typically performed in mass ceremonies.