coercivity


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Related to coercivity: retentivity

coercivity

[‚kō·ər′siv·əd·ē]
(electromagnetism)
The coercive force of a magnetic material in a hysteresis loop whose maximum induction approximates the saturation induction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

coercivity

On magnetic media, the amount of electrical energy required to change the polarization of a bit. The coercivity of hard disks ranges from 500 to 2,000 Oersted. On magneto-optic media, it takes between 5,000 to 10,000 Oersted. See Oersted.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Missell, "The 5: 17 phase in Sm-Nd-Fe," in Proceeding of the 8th International Symposium on Magnetic Anisotropy and Coercivity, C.
Let us note that the coercivity and continuity conditions are sufficient but not necessary as is shown in the forthcoming examples.
Liu et al., "Exchange-coupling interaction, effective anisotropy and coercivity in nanocomposite permanent materials," Journal of Applied Physics, vol.
To obtain ideal coercivity performances, all samples were magnetized in a 50 kOe pulsed magnetic field before VSM measurement.
The boundedness of {[u.sup.n]} is a consequence of the decrease of {[THETA]([u.sup.n])}, the weak coercivity of [THETA], i.e., [THETA](u) [right arrow] [infinity] as [parallel]u[parallel] [right arrow] [infinity], and Condition 2 of Assumption 2.
Coercivity ([H.sub.C]) is the reverse field required to reduce the magnetization to zero from saturation magnetization.
Banks generally use lo-co tape for ATM cards, although many are now moving to medium coercivity (mid-co) for better data retention.
Since coercivity is measured and rated as a bulk property of magnetic media, it is an average property with contributions from individual particles of the media.
Besides the exchange and the demagnetizing field, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and the misorientation of the individual grains also contribute to the resulting magnetization reversal and coercivity [10].
The ease with which a material changes its magnetic polarity depends on a material property termed 'coercivity.' Magnetically soft materials, like the mild steel used for transformer cores, have low coercivity and change their magnetic state easily.
which is nonnegative because of the coercivity of [O.sup.n].
Neodymium plays an important role in maintaining high coercivity (the ability to maintain magnetization) and heat resistance.