cognatic


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Related to cognatic: Cognatic primogeniture

cognatic

(ANTHROPOLOGY)
  1. a kinship term describing consanguinial relations (see CONSANGUINITY), i.e. those based on a blood/biological tie.
  2. (in descent theory), a term describing NON-UNILINEAL DESCENT, i.e. descent traced through male and female links.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the Biangai are cognatic, and women play a central role in nurturing the yam vines, cleaning the garden, and harvesting and cooking the product.
a relatively shallow cognatic descent group, and this provides the most common focus of everyday relationships occurring in Warraber social life.
Appell, ed., The Societies of Borneo: Explorations in the Theory of Cognatic Social Structure.
The editors' introduction situates the essays in terms of both the history of the anthropological study of kinship, especially bilateral or cognatic kinship, and the organization of the volume itself.
The land tenure system is claimed to be matrilineal although the complexity of land inheritance patterns suggests that it may always have had a strong cognatic bias.
The diminution of Kukipi village identity at Nine-Mile can also be related to the cognatic nature of Toaripi kinship which focuses emotional and economic attention on members of the nuclear family, most of whom were now resident in Port Moresby, leaving no effective point of contact in the village (Chao 1989:93; Ryan 1989:21; Morauta and Ryan 1982:50).
At its surface it describes an area that Daniel and his cognatic kin group, or solonarik, use.
Hallpike turns McArthur's argument upside down (or is it inside out?): ceremonialism fragments rather than integrates group coherence, while the multiplicity of cross-cutting ties generated by cognatic kinship is a basic factor encouraging men into conflicts.
The question arose in a PhD thesis by John Smart (1971), which promoted the analytical importance of the conjugal pair in cognatic societies based on fieldwork with the Karagawan Isneg in northern Luzon.
Palmer's position that rights to country are gained by cognatic descent, and lines of descent are traced through one's mother or father.
As alluded to above, these families of polity invariably consist of one or more surname groups or, alternatively, cognatic descent groups (Sutton 2003:212) within the region.