cognitive-behavioral therapy

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cognitive-behavioral therapy

[¦käg·nə·tiv bə¦hāv·yə·rəl ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
A form of psychotherapy that focuses on changing dysfunctional attitudes into more realistic and positive ones and providing new information-processing skills.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
telehealth-based delivery of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: a randomized controlled trial,' Sleep Medicine, February 2013, 15(2): 187-195.
Ramtahal, "Meta-analysis of dropout from cognitive behavioral therapy: Magnitude, timing, and moderators," Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol.
Everyone interested in the future of emerging healthcare techniques majorly in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy are encouraged to attend.
Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a favored treatment method for the aforementioned mental illnesses.
What to do: If you have chronic lower-back pain, give mindfulness-based stress reduction or cognitive behavioral therapy a try.
"Offering brief cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective alternative," Clarke said.
"Most addiction programs have little to no psychiatry and few deal with co-occurring disorders," said Michael Miller, MD, medical director of the Herrington Recovery Center." By incorporating 14 hours of cognitive behavioral therapy into our residential program we are able to effectively treat addiction with common co-occurring psychiatric disorders like mood disorders, anxiety, OCD and trauma."
Short-term cognitive behavioral therapy dramatically reduces suicide attempts among at-risk military personnel, according to findings from a new research study.
In addition, cognitive behavioral therapy changes thoughts, expectations and behaviors related to taking therapy drugs and this therapy can cover coping strategies as well.
Smokers who had failed many attempts to drop the habit did so after a carefully controlled and monitored use of psilocybin, the active hallucinogenic agent in so-called "magic mushrooms," in the context of a cognitive behavioral therapy treatment program, report researchers at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.
The test also predicts who will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy, offering the opportunity for more effective, individualized therapy.

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