cognitive mapping

cognitive mapping

[¦käg·nəd·iv ′map·iŋ]
(psychology)
A group of mental processes that involve acquisition, coding, storing, manipulation, and recall of spatial information.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nyaki, Using fuzzy cognitive mapping as a participatory approach to analyze change, preferred states, and perceived resilience of socialecological systems.
Forter's attention to cognitive mapping in postcolonial historical fiction helps us see something else.
In the final chapter, Soukup warns that the cognitive mapping and liminoid play of iOS are not all peaches and cream.
This study outlines a novel three-dimensional cognitive mapping (3DCM) approach that supports inquiry learning by allowing learners to combine, in a single image, information on a problem, subject knowledge (key concepts and their relationships), and the process of hypothesizing and reasoning involved in exploring the problem.
In a study by Cole and Persi-chitte (2000) generalized the idea of "Pressley and McCormick" and "Kosko" for the cognitive mapping through graphical representation.
Second, given the determinants identified by qualitative analysis, we will perform an analysis by the technique of cognitive mapping to visualize the relative importance of each concept (determinants of financial information disclosure) regarding the disclosure.
2004, Ecological models based on people's knowledge: a multi-step fuzzy cognitive mapping approach, Ecological Modelling, 176(1-2), pp.
In order to achieve the outlined goals, we chose to develop a model obtained through cognitive mapping. Despite the different uses of the term "cognitive map", and the different approaches to its preparation and analysis, in a similar way to Markoczy and Goldberg (1995), Bastos (2002), Scavarda (2004) and Bouzdine-Chameeva (2007), in this research cognitive mapping is understood as the representation of the understanding of an individual concerning a researched subject.
How we might use the Jamesonian concepts of the "empowered imagination" and "cognitive mapping" to discover these radical alternatives is the focus of Chapter 3, "Power to the Imagination." Tally identifies a reemergence of 1960s-era cultural idealism in the postmodern, especially the existentialism of Sartre and his goal of achieving "a life without anxiety" (51).

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