cognomen

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cognomen

(originally) an ancient Roman's third name or nickname, which later became his family name
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(1965): The Latin Cognomina. Helsinki-Helsingfors: Keskurkirjapaino.
We publish the Top One Hundred list in the various categories to honour those contrary individuals and their contrary cognomina.
Three of the four names that follow are diminutives of Roman aristocratic male cognomina, like Drusilla, and perhaps might be translated "Muffy and Buffy and Dixie and Trixie and Pixie."
Athenians with the Roman gentilicium Casianus and the cognomina Apollonios and Philippos occur in the second half of the second and the first half of the third century A.D.
Relying chiefly upon the rhetorical treatises of Cicero, the author focuses on four common types of humorous invective: mockery of physical deformities, derogatory cognomina, accusations about indecent use of the mouth (for sex or drink), and charges of male effeminacy.
A growing interest in rhetorical technique and politics is exemplified by **Controlling Laughter: Political Humor in the Late Roman Republic.(22) Such content is both extensive and pretty savage - hence chapters on physical peculiarities, names and cognomina (e.g., Verres = `an uncastrated boar'), mouths (with a neat comparison of Pierre Bourdieu on the bourgeois bouche and the working-class class gueule: `The French mouth, like the Roman, draws attention to itself both verbally and visually, until it dominates the head and allows conclusions to be drawn about social position and internal character', 125-6), and effeminacy.
Aufidius Orestes (cost 71), an Aurelius Orestes adopted by an Aufidius, as an early example of this new system.(12) More analogous to our case, where the adoptee ends up with two cognomina, is M.
Who can now seriously study Roman epigraphy, or social history, or prosopography, without having at hand Kajanto's Latin Cognomina (1965) or Solin's Die griechischen Personennamen in Rom (1982) or Solin's and Salomies's Repertorium Nominum Gentilium et Cognominum Latinorum (1988)?
Eric Maikranz's novel 'The Reincarnationist Papers', 'Infinite' revolves around the Cognomina, a secret society of people who can recall their past lives.