coherent units

coherent units

[kō′hir·ənt ′yü·nəts]
(physics)
A system of units, such as the International System, in which the units of derived quantities are formed as products or quotients of units of the base quantities according to the algebraic relations linking these quantities.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The most useful may be the engagement simulations trainer (EST) and the call-for-fire trainer (CFF), as these simulators do not necessarily require coherent units to facilitate training.
Now, scientists using HiRISE images have determined that entire dunes as thick as 200 feet are moving as coherent units across the Martian landscape.
Finally, there are the SI prefixes for forming multiples and submultiples of coherent units in order to express values of quantities significantly larger or smaller than the units.
Second, states are coherent units that we don't have to invent, with machinery and systems already in place that are well known and manipulable, familiar to the populace.
Coverage includes an overview of conversation and conversation analysis; transcribing conversation; how turns at talk are structured and managed by participants; how turns at talk are organized into conversation as sequences; how basic sequences can be expanded to produce larger, coherent units of conversational action; and the repair system available to speakers to deal with problems that arise in talk.
Instead of dividing the Moon into arbitrary sections defined by orthogonal lines, Cohen perceptively centers his maps and descriptions around geologically coherent units, such as mare basins.
91-241) presents the one hundred fragments of the Chester Beatty papyrus, grouped into twenty-three coherent units. Each unit opens with the transcribed Greek text; opposite is a reconstructed text (separating words, filling lacunae), followed by an English translation and extensive notes.
The two duchies aside, it did not enjoy or seek to establish coherent units as did, for example, the Coke family in north and central Norfolk.
Managed competition proponents argue that their model offers real price competition by organizing providers and consumers into coherent units. These units engage in negotiations to provide high-quality care and obtain services at a reasonable cost.
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (NPAC) and the IFCC issued two reports in 1966 (8) and 1967 (9), now giving a proper term to the coherent unit, namely: