cohesive soil


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Related to cohesive soil: cohesionless soil, granular soil

cohesive soil

[kō′hē·siv ′sȯil]
(geology)
A sticky soil, such as clay or silt; its shear strength equals about half its unconfined compressive strength.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cohesive soil

1.A soil which when unconfined has appreciable cohesion when submerged, and considerable strength when air-dried.
2. Soil, such as clay, whose particles adhere to each other by means of adhesive and cohesive forces.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main objective of this study is therefore to explore the effects of industrial effluents on the geotechnical properties of local cohesive soils. Considering the widespread paper and textile industry in Pakistan, effluents from these industries are employed in this study.
Lee, "Centrifuge modeling of cohesive soil slopes reinforced by stabilizing piles," Chinese Journal of Geotechnical Engineering, vol.
The direct shear test (ASTM D 3080) is commonly utilized approach to find the shear strength of granular soil mostly and less frequently the soil having a fraction of cohesive soil (Yoshida et al., 1991; Farooq et al., 2004; Orense et al., 2004; and Farooq et al., 2014).
With regard to the genesis of cohesive soil horizons, researchers still disagree as to the processes involved.
--middle layer composed of older backfill containing mineral non-cohesive ID = 0.2 to 0.7 and cohesive soil IL = 0.2 to 0.55.
The Mechanistic-Empirical Design Guide (MEPDG) [2] requires the resilient modulus of unbound and cohesive soil materials to characterize layers for their structural design.
The pile-reinforcement behavior of cohesive soil slope was investigated using numerical analysis and centrifuge model tests.
The soils around the interceptor are a mixture of granular and cohesive soil, with ground water levels as much as 30 to 80 feet above the invert of the interceptor.
As undercutting by seepage erosion progresses along a streambank, blocks of cohesive soil above the seepage point fail due to their increased weight and reduced support.
In this study clay soil added with Microsilica is used to evaluate existing failure criteria for cohesive soil. The body as acted upon by an externally applied stress system, the state of stress on any plane through the body obtained by the clay soil performed in this study.
Both cohesive soil and non-cohesive soils were investigated.