cohort


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Related to cohort: Cohort study, Cohort Analysis

cohort

Biology a taxonomic group that is a subdivision of a subclass (usually of mammals) or subfamily (of plants)

cohort

a group of persons possessing a common characteristic, such as being born in the same year, or entering school on the same date. The term is usually used in making generalizations derived from quantitative data (see QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES).

Cohort

 

(Latin cohors ). (1) A tactical subdivision of a legion in ancient Rome from the second century B.c. A legion had ten cohorts, each with from 360 to 600 men.

(2) Figuratively, a tightly knit group of people.

(3) A biological classification category that unites several related orders. For instance, the cohort of the Unguiculata includes the orders Insectívora, Dermoptera, Chiroptera, and Primates.

cohort

[′kō‚hȯrt]
(statistics)
A group of individuals who experience a significant event, such as birth, during the same period of time.
References in periodicals archive ?
OneRun can now anticipate what that users' behavior will be, based on the activities that the cohort has exhibited.
Birth cohort screening would lead to 1,162,323 patients being diagnosed with previously unknown chronic HCV, they estimated.
A recent study in the Lancet compared the cognitive and physical functioning of two cohorts of Danish nonagenarians, born 10 years apart.
This means that top performers of each cohort have been hit most severely by the publication bottleneck.
The current study is designed to verify the presence of age, period and cohort effects in the distribution of Quebec suicide rates between 1950 and 2009.
Data sources included the following: (a) electronic mail exchanges among cohort members and with the instructor; (b) class members' Webblog postings; (c) instructor notes on the brainstorming sessions, decision making process and class discussions; (d) instructor reflections on the process of implementing the assignment; and (e) cohort members' end-of-course reflections.
Less than 20 percent of submissions in each cohort contained deficiencies that were not related to quality, but still would be addressed with an AI letter, and therefore, also would stop the review clock.
The analysis presented here will provide measures of the turnover experienced by high-tech startups in the Valley and of factors that influence the survival and growth of new companies, while also assessing the fitness of the 2000 high-tech cohort.
Each cohort meets yearly for an intensive two-week seminar facilitated by School of Intercultural Studies faculty.
Each cohort would host firms offering similar roles and opportunities.
THE NLN/JOHNSON & JOHNSON FACULTY LEADERSHIP AND MENTORING PROGRAM, funded by J&J for a third cohort of mentors and proteges to begin working together in September, aims to prepare early or mid-career faculty members as leaders through ongoing one-to-one mentorship.
At age 20, individuals in the earliest cohort could expect to live another 36 years; for the latest cohort, the figure was 49 years.