coil

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coil:

see inductorinductor,
electric device consisting of one or more turns of wire and typically having two terminals. An inductor is usually connected into a circuit in order to raise the inductance to a desired value.
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; solenoidsolenoid
, device made of a long wire that has been wound many times into a tightly packed coil; it has the shape of a long cylinder. If current is sent through a solenoid made of insulated wire and having a length much greater than its diameter, a uniform magnetic field will be
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.

Coil

One or more turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit. At power line and audio frequencies a coil has a large number of turns of insulated wire wound close together on a form made of insulating material, with a closed iron core passing through the center of the coil. This is commonly called a choke and is used to pass direct current while offering high opposition to alternating current.

At higher frequencies a coil may have a powdered iron core or no core at all. The electrical size of a coil is called inductance and is expressed in henries or millihenries. In addition to the resistance of the wire, a coil offers an opposition to alternating current, called reactance, expressed in ohms. The reactance of a coil increases with frequency. See Inductor

coil

[kȯil]
(control systems)
Any discrete and logical result that can be transmitted as output by a programmable controller.
(electromagnetism)
A number of turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit, to produce magnetic flux, or to react mechanically to a changing magnetic flux; in high-frequency circuits a coil may be only a fraction of a turn. Also known as electric coil; inductance; inductance coil; inductor.
(science and technology)
An arrangement of flexible material into a spiral or helix.

Coil

One or more turns of wire used to introduce inductance into an electric circuit. At power line and audio frequencies a coil has a large number of turns of insulated wire wound close together on a form made of insulating material, with a closed iron core passing through the center of the coil. This is commonly called a choke and is used to pass direct current while offering high opposition to alternating current.

At higher frequencies a coil may have a powdered iron core or no core at all. The electrical size of a coil is called inductance and is expressed in henries or millihenries. In addition to the resistance of the wire, a coil offers an opposition to alternating current, called reactance, expressed in ohms. The reactance of a coil increases with frequency. See Inductor, Reactor (electricity)

heat exchanger

A device designed to transfer heat between two physically separated fluids; generally consists of a cylindrical shell with longitudinal tubes; one fluid flows on the inside, the other on the outside.

coil

1. an electrical conductor wound into the form of a spiral, sometimes with a soft iron core, to provide inductance or a magnetic field
2. the transformer in a petrol engine that supplies the high voltage to the sparking plugs
References in periodicals archive ?
We have focused this research on uniformity of magnetic field and the differences in determination of coils conversion constant.
One 500-foot coil of 2-inch PA-11 was secured on the unwind stand of the trailer.
1) AE signals induced from typical phenomena of wire motion and friction in a high-temperature SC coil were demonstrated.
The company has received 510(k) clearance and CE Mark for both its MicroPlex Coil System and the HydroCoil Embolization System to treat cerebral aneurysms.
In an informal survey at the ASITN meeting, about 40% of the audience of 150 neuroradiologists responded that inflammation, edema, or hydrocephalus was of "great concern" with bioactive coated coils.
While showing that coils are "another viable option" for aneurysm repair, he says, the study doesn't establish the technique as superior to clipping.
2] is determined by a phase [delta] of a radio-frequency field at the moment a neutron enters a coil.
The maintenance costs of electromagnetic systems are typically low, although the systems used for maintaining alignment (mechanical or air bearings and diaphragms) often require maintenance to ensure optimum performance, and the leads to the moving coil have a finite fatigue life.
In addition to the possible long-term damage that many of the mosquito coil pollutants may cause, the researchers concluded that significant acute health effects, including asthmatic reactions and eye and respiratory irritation, could be expected from exposure to the combustion product acrolein.
Branches to the blushing tumor from both of these vessels were embolized first with 500- to 700-micron polyvinyl alcohol particles and then with platinum coils.
In a group of fifteen gouaches on paper, the serpents enclose the earth, sky, and stars in their coils in a protective embrace, incubating the planet or the cosmos: The maternal image alludes to the male and female nature of the archetypal serpent, which is both soul and libido.
Coils [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED] should be inspected monthly for signs of arcing, overheating or discoloring on the coil insulation.