Virginity

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Virginity

See also Chastity, Purity.
Agnes, St.
patron saint of virgins. [Christian Hagiog.: Brewer Dictionary, 16]
Atala
Indian maiden learns too late she can be released from her vow to remain a virgin. [Fr. Lit.: Atala]
Athena
goddess who had no love affairs and never married, called Parthenos, ‘the Virgin.’ [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 60]
Cecilia, St.
consecrated self to God, bridegroom followed suit. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 81–82]
Chrysanthus and Daria, Sts.
sexless marriage for glory of God. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 86]
Drake, Temple
chastity makes her the object of attacks. [Am. Lit.: Sanctuary]
garden, enclosed
wherein grow the red roses of chastity. [Christian Symbolism: De Virginibus, Appleton, 41]
Josyan
steadfastly retains virginity for future husband. [Br. Lit.: Bevis of Hampton]
Lygia
foreign princess remains chaste despite Roman orgies. [Polish Lit.: Quo Vadis, Magill I, 797–799]
lily
symbol of Blessed Virgin; by extension, chastity. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 57–58]
ostrich egg
symbolic of virgin birth. [Art: Hall, 110]
red and white roses, garland of
emblem of virginity, esp. of the Virgin Mary. [Christian Iconog.: Jobes, 374]
Vestals
six pure girls; tended fire sacred to Vesta. [Rom. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1127]
Virgin Mary, Blessed
mother of Jesus. [Christianity: NCE, 1709]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Myth: Women should have Pap smears with each change of sexual partner, at age 18 years, or immediately following coitarche.
Reality: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women begin having Pap smears beginning at age 21 years or 3 years post coitarche.
Susanne witnessed the aftermath of one pack-rape incident, and age at coitarche (first vaginal intercourse) seems ever more associated with breast development that is, with increasingly younger (physiological) ages, which empirically drops but cognitively helps to moot the 'age of consent' past which too few care.