cold stress


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cold stress

[′kōld ‚stres]
(mechanics)
Forces tending to deform steel, cement, and other materials, resulting from low temperatures.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among cereals rice is most affected cereal by cold stress so by broadening the rice gene pool through introducing cold tolerance traits and its related genes in wild rice, its production can be enhanced (Xie et al., 2012).
When the index lying around zero (-0.5 to +0.5) PMV indicates comfort while the deviation from zero is referred to as thermal stress and varies on a seven-point scale between -3 (cold stress) and +3 (heat stress).
The most-common types of cold stress include hypothermia, frostbite, and trench foot.
In Algiers, from the winter season (December-February) till the first decade of March, 40% of the days with PET < 18[degrees]C (slight cold to extreme cold stress classes) are recorded.
Cold stress inhibits rice growth during all growth stages, ranging from vegetative to reproductive stages.
The inbred SC676 presents greater tolerance to low temperatures than the other genotypes, therefore being suitable for the generation of a cultivar with adequate agronomic performance in rice production regions prone to cold stress in the South of Brazil.
This allows for communication of thermal conditions using simple descriptive words such as "extreme heat stress" or "moderate cold stress" [see sidebar "UTCI and mean radiant temperature [T.sub.mrt]"].
Far fewer studies have investigated tolerance to natural stressors other than high temperature, but an experimental study of the coral Acropora yongei exposed to 26 [+ or -] 5 [degrees]C suggests that short-term exposure to cold stress (<5 d) may be more detrimental to photosynthesis and growth rate compared to heat stress, though the reverse may be true under long-term stress (Roth et al., 2012).
Diverse plant species tolerate cold stress to a varying degree, which depends on reprogramming gene expression to modify their physiology, metabolism, and growth (Chinnusamy et al., 2010).
Sudden and increasingly painful cold stress causes massive discharge of the sympathetic nervous system and release of norepinephrine.