collapsar


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collapsar

[kə′lap‚sär]
(astronomy)
A black hole that forms during the gravitational collapse of a massive star.
References in periodicals archive ?
Siegel said infrared instruments such as those on the James Webb Space Telescope, set for launch in 2021, should be able to detect telltale radiation pointing to heavy elements from a collapsar in a far-distant galaxy.
These observed facts mean that we live in the inner space of an object which is either collapsar or is in the state which is very close to the state of collapse.
Sari, "Short versus long and collapsars versus non-collapsars: a quantitative classification of gamma-ray bursts," The Astrophysical Journal, vol.
The radius of the collapsar [r.sub.c] and the radius of the breaking space [r.sub.br] have the forms, respectively:
In the collapsar model, there are additional physical processes that can lead to the creation of greater masses of radioactive nickel.
The properties of GRB afterglows at X-ray, visible, and radio wavelengths match predictions of the collapsar model.
Two papers scheduled for an upcoming Astrophysical Journal Letters appear to support the collapsar model.
It is true that OS also found that in this limit there is a region inside the collapsar from which light may not be emitted, but we shall show below that this is not a real property of the model, and that it may be easily repaired so that all points of the physical space, exterior and interior, remain causally connected at all times.
In a model developed by Stan Woosley of the University of California, Santa Cruz and his colleagues, this failed supernova, or collapsar, produces a gamma-ray burst that lasts about 20 seconds.
In addition we consider the range of angles for which light originating at the surface of such a collapsar crosses the photonsphere, at 1.5 times the gravitational radius, and consequently may reach a terrestrial telescope.
According to the popular "collapsar" model--a detailed physical mechanism to explain core-collapse hypernovae developed by Stanford E.
As these theorists and many others see it, many GRBs occur when a collapsar (the collapsing core of a massive star) ends its life by catastrophically expelling jets that briefly but powerfully emit gamma rays (S&T: February 2001, page 22).