Collared Dove

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Collared Dove

 

(Streptopelia decaocto), also collared turtle dove, a bird of the family Columbidae. It measures 28 cm long and weights up to 150 g. The back is brownish gray. There is a black half-collar on the neck and the tail is edged with white. The legs are red. The collared dove is distributed in southern Asia and in Europe; after the 1940’s it settled as far as eastern France, Scotland, southern Norway, and Finland. Moving eastward in the USSR it has reached Estonia and Byelorussia and Poltava, Kharkov, and Kherson oblasts. From Afghanistan it penetrated into Turkmenia and has settled along the valley of the Tedzen River. Keeping to populated places, it nests on buildings and trees, two to four times a summer. The bird feeds mainly on seeds.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Collared doves are monogamous but like all such birds, their pairings can be devastated by such as sparrowhawks.
Collared doves do have small broods, but the bonus for the species is that they are quite capable of having multiple broods throughout the year.
The collared doves and rock doves too Contribute to the hullabaloo, Then a flash of colour, lovely red, When the bullfinch shows his head.
Small seeds, such as millet, |attract mostly house sparrows, dunnocks, finches, reed buntings and collared doves, while flaked maize is taken readily by blackbirds.
The thought occurred to me that I might have a chance at my first double on collared doves.
"All the collared doves want to do is hang out at the shed," said Chuck Perry of Perry Farms in Yazoo City (www.huntperryfarms.com) with a chuckle.
Eurasian collared doves (often called ring neck doves) are not native to Florida and therefore have no bag limits or closed seasons under state or federal law.
Small seeds, such as millet, attract mostly house sparrows, dunnocks, finches, reed buntings and collared doves, while flaked maize is taken readily by blackbirds.
Collared doves aren't great nest makers - sometimes chicks fall through the flimsy branches.
Both the band-tailed pigeons and Eurasian collared doves are considered good table fare.