collateral

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collateral

(kəlăt`ərəl), something of value given or pledged as security for payment of a loan. Collateral consists usually of financial instruments, such as stocks, bonds, and negotiable paper, rather than physical goods, although the latter may also be accepted as such. In case of default, the creditor may sell the collateral and apply the money thus acquired to payment of the debt, charging the debtor with any deficiency or crediting him with any surplus. The borrower may usually substitute other collateral for that held by the lender if it is acceptable to the latter. Such a privilege is particularly useful to borrowers who buy and sell securities. Merchandise collateral—such as negotiable warehouse receipts, bills of lading, and trust receipts—is also used, as is personal collateral, including deeds, mortgages, leases, and other rights in real estate. Other collateral may include bills of sale of movable goods, such as crops, machinery, furniture, and livestock, and savings-bank passbooks.
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collateral

[kə′lad·ə·rəl]
(anatomy)
A side branch of a blood vessel or nerve.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

collateral

1. a person, animal, or plant descended from the same ancestor as another but through a different line
2. descended from a common ancestor but through different lines
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, positive effects were observed when the feed rate and the spindle speed collaterally changed with each other.
As with any other type of judgment, legal regimes prefer that constitutional challenges to convictions and sentences be litigated in the direct-review chain rather than collaterally. After a defendant is convicted, however, collateral process does afford her a postconviction forum.
Since Epstein, courts have issued diverging opinions on whether finality in class judgments trumps allowing class members broad latitude to collaterally attack judgments.
Because a district court and an appellate court in the original fraud case had already determined that the taxpayers committed fraud, Evans was collaterally estopped from claiming that the requirements of Sec.
Methods must be found to meet the needs of arriving victims without claiming care providers as collaterally damaged victims themselves.
A fixation period of 4 weeks has been adviced.4 Treatment of trauamatized immature permanent teeth is especially complicated due to the potential harm to the permanent tooth collaterally.
"They could however be used to incite terror by attacking cities, which is unlikely in my view as if you take Bahrain for example there is a large Shi'ite community because of inaccuracy of the missiles a lot of their religious cohorts would be killed collaterally.
"We may otherwise suppose that the Eritrean regime hopes that the solution to the 'Afar Problem' is to allow Saudi-led coalition forces and Houthi rebels-Salih Forces to collaterally eradicate the Afar people in the crossfire".
This is how we contribute to the cultivation of an emotion in a teenager or young man, who in a moment like that can say, "You know what, if I die in the process of just getting revenge for my uncle, I'll be happy." There are too many moments--call them "collaterally caused" moments--that are a byproduct of our foreign policy, which has contributed to that most unfortunate negative sentiment in many countries in the Muslim world--sufficient to motivate the fraction of a fraction of a percent of the 1,500,000,000 1.600.000.
While DOL's application of the new "employee" definition will not collaterally estop a separate finding by Employment Security, it would likely be taken into account, especially if the determination is being made contemporaneously, as it typically happens.
When the action in the case finally started after the state court case had ended, Blagaich moved for summary judgment, arguing that the IRS was collaterally estopped from litigating that the $343,819 of cash and property she received from Burns should be included in her income because the state court had held they were gifts.
If it does, it will be further interesting to see if the district court finds AAA collaterally estopped from arguing the issue of likelihood of confusion again.