Collective Nouns

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Collective Nouns

 

nouns that refer to a group of persons, objects, or phenomena as an indivisible whole. Examples are rodnia (“kinsfolk”), molodezh’ (“young people”), studenchestvo (“students”), dich’ (“game animals”), and bel’e (“laundry”). Collective nouns may not be used in the plural or in combination with cardinal numbers, in contrast to nouns referring to a group of similar objects or persons, for example, “group” or “herd.”

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Due to the size of the corpora, this investigation was limited to a maximum of 6,000 instances per collective noun.
The non-count nouns can be reformulated as countable in partitive expressions (PART), such as a piece of advice, among which are collective nouns (COL), for example, a school in a school of cod.
Collective nouns are words that name a group with several members, such as audience, class, flock, jury, and team.
Since the collective noun in its narrowest sense--according to its meaning --is not really used in plural, it would perhaps be better to use the term collective noun only for the nouns with suffixes, whose morphological structure already shows what group of identical individuals they denote, see the following examples:
In Dutch, verbs are generally singular, no matter whether the collective noun is animate or not (see above), but as far as pronominal concord is concerned, animacy definitely plays a role.
Maggie understands that these fractions are greater than one, so without resorting to mixed numbers, she used the plural form of her collective noun to describe the fractional parts.
Jespersen, for instance, defines collectives as "words which denote a unit made up of several things or beings which may be counted separately" (Persson 1989), and Levin (2001: 13), the latest scholar to discuss it to my knowledge, calls collective nouns "singular nouns denoting groups of entities and taking plural targets".
b) TEI believes the term "public" may be too narrow; it technically may not include foreign individuals or corporations; it is also a "mass or collective noun," whereas the IRS may wish to stress that it wants to interact with its "customers" on a one-on-one, individual basis.
Here, the singular collective noun audience is followed by the plural they're, which doesn't agree in number with "audience," "a number" or "a person.
Beware dualistic thinking, I tell myself; but also more specifically now, beware starting any sentence with a collective noun.
Few countries outside Britain have a collective noun for their civil service.
In the Link Gallery, Janis Goodman is showing The Ubiquity of Sparrows, a play on the collective noun for the tiny garden birds.

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