collectivity


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collectivity

any grouping of individuals that ‘cuts across the actor (see SOCIAL ACTOR) as a composite unit’ (PARSONS, 1951).
References in periodicals archive ?
Spivak also discusses Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness in connection to the question of capitalist imperialism and collectivity that she had explored earlier on in her discussion of A Room of One's Own.
What Nancy and Agamben offer in The Inoperative Community (1991) and The Coming Community (1993) respectively is a conception of community that is marked by a shift in thinking of the idea of community as a concept that we always already occupy, of being in (hence one is red, French or Muslim, or an activist), to one that sees it as a concept that does not have a guarantee of meaning, identity, belonging; a concept that does not have an essence--that of a unified collectivity. This is Nancy's idea of "community without community" (1991: 71).
The research project takes up this issue, aiming to model information processes of collectivity and to structure this phenomenon through the identification of its quantitative dimension.
(3) Second, considering the document's appearance in Sisterhood, I examine the implications for race-consciousness in the movement at large and what women's liberation anthologies and print culture could and could not do for race-conscious collectivity. CR documents joined other ephemeral forms such as position statements, manifestoes, and field reports and more literary forms such as personal essays, short stories, and poems in influential anthologies like Notes from the First Year (1968), (4) Notes from the Second Year (1969), (5) The Black Woman (1970), (6) Voices from Women's Liberation (1971), (7) and Woman in Sexist Society (1972), (8) in addition to Sisterhood.
Following Selznick (1992) and Greenwood (1988), it can be argued that collective practice is practice institutionalised in a social collectivity. Institutionalisation has been defined "...
The collectivity thus created the distinct agencies in which members of the town expressed their pertinence to the collectivity.
Decades later and in an American context, both collegiality and collectivity now seem primarily academic virtues, practices nurtured in the constraints and opportunities of teaching and undergoing new pressures with the transformations of our institutions.
"We want ministers and the Executive to be more accountable, business to be more effective with more transparency as well as collectivity.
The author posits that just as a map of genome--the collectivity of genes and chromosomes--explains the life structure and condition of an organism, it would be possible to trace a cultural genome by identifying designers' thoughts and actual words.
If, for instance, the thwarted expectations of individual human beings matter, then so should the thwarted expectations of a collectivity such as a neighborhood association.
However, and following Spinoza's determination that every individual is composed of other individuals and that every body is the effect of the motions of other bodies that act upon it, a new insight arises: in order to liberate the body from its subjection to the actions of other bodies it is necessary to liberate those other bodies, that is, the community: "not simply the liberation of an individual who is the owner of himself and his rights, but the liberation of the collectivity outside of which the individual has no existence and apart from which the freedom of the individual is inconceivable" (p.
These critics argue that assigning duties or attributing blame to a collectivity is either sloppy shorthand for referring to the actions of individual human beings, or worse, mere nonsense.