colligative properties

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colligative properties

colligative properties, properties of a solution that depend on the number of solute particles present but not on the chemical properties of the solute. Colligative properties of a solution include freezing point (see freezing), boiling point, osmotic pressure (see osmosis), and solvent vapor pressure. By measuring these properties and comparing them with the corresponding properties of the pure solvent, it is possible to determine the number of particles of solute present in the solution. If the mass of solute present is also known, the number-average molecular weight can be calculated by dividing the mass of solute by the number of particles present to obtain the average mass per particle.
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colligative properties

[kə′lig·ə·div ‚präp·ərd·ēz]
(physical chemistry)
Properties dependent on the number of molecules but not their nature.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, this colligative property plays a critical role in the selection of sweeteners for boiled candies and taffy.
The Solubility module covers a wide range of concepts: vapor pressure and solution equilibrium, molecular solvation, and factors affecting solubility, miscibility, dispersion, and colligative properties of solutions.
(1.) Our attempt to "narrativize" this complex set of events within the contingent and colligative bounds of a "story" is not to be read as an authoritative account of what actually took place in the oil industry in the 1970s and 1980s.
Methods based on colligative properties like osmotic pressure, and Raoult's law yield the number average molecular weight, whereas light scattering methods yield the weight average molecular weight.
[1970]: 'Colligative Properties of Anomalous Water', Nature, 226, pp.
Fiser and Fairfull (1986) stated that glycerol provides cryopreservation partly on a colligative basis by reducing the amount of ice formation and partly kinetically by increasing the time for water to leave the cell in response to the decreased vapor pressure of adjacent ice.
Recognizing that DMSP is employed by some organisms to help set the colligative properties of cellular solutions, Nishiguchi and Somero (1992) studied the effects of DMSP on cellular proteins.