collision efficiency

collision efficiency

[kə′lizh·ən i′fish·ən·sē]
(meteorology)
The fraction of all water-drops which, initially moving on a collision course with respect to other drops, actually collide (make surface contact) with the other drops.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Where: K: Boltzmann constant (1.38 x10-23 J/[grados]K); T: temperature ([grados]K); Vf: Filtration velocity (m/s, or m/h) dp: Particle diameter (m) dc: collector diameter (m) [my]: Viscosity of water (NS/m) g: gravity (9.81 m/[s.sup.2]) C: effluent concentration (mg/L); Co: Influent concentration (mg/L); L: Filter length (cm) [epsilon]: porosity of the filter media; [eta]: efficiency of a collector; [alfa]: collision efficiency, probability of adhesion or adhesion factor [delta]: specific deposit (g/[m.sup.3]); t: Time (h).
Figure 7 shows the concept of collision efficiency of water drops and paint mist.
Figure 8 shows collision efficiency between water drops and paint mist on the assumption with water drop dia of 200 micrometers and air-fluid relative speed (collision speed) at 20 m/s.
Unfortunately, one of the problems with this "ball-in, ballout" method is that bats moments-of-inertia below 7000 ozin (2) tend to have extremely low collision efficiency (or BESR) so that they often don't rebound with enough speed to pass through the ball speed gates.
The speed of a hit ball in play ([v.sub.h]) depends on the pitch speed ([v.sub.p]), the bat speed ([v.sub.b]) and a term called the collision efficiency ([e.sub.a]):
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