colloquy

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colloquy

1. a literary work in dialogue form
2. an informal conference on religious or theological matters
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Wadood's colloquies lead to the central moment of an explosion that took place in al-Mutanabi Street in 2007.
This volume includes papers delivered at a conference, held in April 2013 at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, to celebrate the 450th anniversary of the edition of Garcia de Orta's Colloquies on the Simples and Drugs of India (1563).
After almost four decades of research, Scheib has published a detailed history of Christian religious colloquies. He introduces the reader to a broad variety of interconfessional dialogues from the third to the 19th century, with his main focus on the Reformation (vol.
Through colloquies, exhibitions, ongoing conversations, and the creation of new educational resources for schools as well as older audiences, the Five Faiths Project involved not only museum staff and an impressive group of museum and academic colleagues, but also faith practitioners, educators, and the community at large.
This Note argues that federal district courts have the authority under Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 43(b)(1) to compel the attendance of organizational defendants (25) at plea colloquies. Part I demonstrates that the Rules are best read together in a way that gives the district courts this power.
Such contradictions are not uncommon in the medieval religious colloquies that precede Sahagun's text.
In these nineteen colloquies, optimism is tinged with regret.
DUTCH PROVERBS AND EXPRESSIONS IN THE COLLOQUIES AND OTHER WORKS
By the time he wrote his Colloquies, Southey had homed in on perhaps the most durable critique of capitalism, the aesthetic.
Anglo-Saxon Conversations: The Colloquies of AElfric Bata.
Kuhaupt defines the goal of his study as threefold: to reveal the conditions under which the new evangelical understanding of the church was shaped and publicly articulated in the initial years of formal religious colloquies between evangelical theologians and their Roman Catholic counterparts (1538-41), to place this process in its larger context within the history of the German empire, and to examine the ecclesiastical-political developments from the standpoint of the use of the medium of print (15).