collusion

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collusion

a secret agreement between opponents at law in order to obtain a judicial decision for some wrongful or improper purpose

collusion

A secret agreement for illegal or fraudulent purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congress placed no limit on which parties fell under [section] 1359's purview: "any party" includes parties improperly or collusively joined as either plaintiffs or defendants.
There was an opportunity provided by USF recovery plans, fostered by the FCC, to jointly increase prices more collusively. That all three carriers succeeded in more than full USF recovery from increased Lerner margins was indicated by an FCC order limiting recovery surcharges to the required contribution.
Robert Tillman and Michael Indergaard note in a report to the Institute for Fraud Prevention ("Control Overrides in Financial Statement Fraud," 2007) that senior executives, often the CEO and CFO, can collusively deceive the auditors and audit committee by withholding information and providing false informafion.
For a consideration of issues relevant to 'export cartels' see--Brendan Sweeney, 'Export Cartels: Is there a need for Global Rules?', Journal of International Economic Law, 10(1), 87 at 89--"export cartels are agreements between exporter to act collusively in respect of some aspects of their export activity." And at 90 " ...
collusively transferring the property to a close associate, allegedly at
These apparently collusively fixed surcharges include a variety of costs that presumably should vary as among carriers, such as equipment repositioning charges and paper work filing.
The aesthetic can also speak just as loudly, without necessarily getting caught in the fateful opposition of the autistically advanced or collusively popular.
Hayashi's Yukiko participates collusively in the expanding project of colonial libido; Masugi's female characters bridge the colony and the metropole with their own sexualized bodies while the bodies of Kinko and Jun's mother in Sakaguchi's tale were mobilized to become objects of containment for both colonials and nationalists.
Bain (1951) suggested the market power hypothesis, which proposed that in highly concentrated markets firms could act collusively and thus achieve high profits.
At the moment everyone keeps their commissions high, and it will stay that way for as long as the banks continue to behave collusively."
However, anyone who has taken Auditing 101 knows that despite admonitions to have checks and balances and segregation of duties, internal controls are easily overridden by senior management acting collusively.