colophon


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colophon

(kŏl`əfŏn') [Gr.,=finishing stroke]. Before the use of printing in Western Europe a manuscript often ended with a statement about the author, the scribe, or the illuminator. The first printed book to have a comparable concluding statement was the Mainz Psalter, crediting the printer and giving the date printed (1457) in its last paragraph. After this, a printed book commonly ended with this statement, now called a colophon. The information came to be given on the title page after c.1520. The name colophon is applied also to a printer's mark or a publisher's device on a title page or elsewhere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, each section opens with a poem by the author, and each has its own colophon on the last printed page.
Additional colophons, added at later dates, continued the dramatic story.
Likewise, a closer examination of The Colophon and the many lines of interconnection it facilitated can only enhance Benton, McGann, and other scholars' work on modern American publishing practices.
Counterculture Colophon complements Braddock's work with its claim that Grove's "most significant achievement was to establish and expand the circuits through which experimental and radical literature was distributed, particularly to the burgeoning college and university populations that were the seedbed of the counterculture, effectively democratizing the avant-garde" (12).
Axton and Cameron both assert that John Rastell wrote the Philosopher's epilogue, a humanist discourse that concludes just above Rastell's me fieri fecit colophon.
The colophon finishes with references to Ireland's pitiable state with its "intleda," "breic," and "fingail" ("traps and deceits and kin-slaying") as well as the outrages the author perceives as being perpetrated by "drochdoini etir saxanchu agus herenchu," by "bad people, both English and Irish" (I).
Together, they examine what sort of information might be gleaned from medieval colophons, what the colophon was designed to do from the point of view of its writers, and, in chapter five, what the overall goal of scribal activity was thought to be by those who practiced it.
The writers, who were lodged at the Chrysalis Inn & Spa, dined at Flats Wine & Tapas Bar, Colophon Cafe, Skylark's Hidden Cafe, Magdalena's Creperie, Nimbus, and Fino and toured local farms.
In May 1932, the 3,000 subscribers to The Colophon read an essay by one of the era's most famous poets recalling the publication of his first book of poems.
The work plainly effuses charm and humor; it less obviously frames an involved aesthetic and metaphysical debate with the poetic voices of the past, and demonstrates the polyphony of colophon, seal, and image that defines Chinese painting at its most subtle and cohesive.
It was not until his 1498 edition of The Assembly that De Worde made explicit the ascription of this text to Lydgate, and he did so in a colophon that, as Gillespie perceptively shows, replicates the phrasing of the one used in his edition of the Canterbury Tales of the same year, suggesting that both editions might have been marketed as companion pieces.