colophon


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colophon

(kŏl`əfŏn') [Gr.,=finishing stroke]. Before the use of printing in Western Europe a manuscript often ended with a statement about the author, the scribe, or the illuminator. The first printed book to have a comparable concluding statement was the Mainz Psalter, crediting the printer and giving the date printed (1457) in its last paragraph. After this, a printed book commonly ended with this statement, now called a colophon. The information came to be given on the title page after c.1520. The name colophon is applied also to a printer's mark or a publisher's device on a title page or elsewhere.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, each section opens with a poem by the author, and each has its own colophon on the last printed page.
(11.) The two ESTC records indicate that the only difference between STC 15376 and 15377 is their colophon date.
Additional colophons, added at later dates, continued the dramatic story.
The author is to be commended for paying an unusual attention to reception, and for having discussed and contextualized the manuscripts' colophons, which often contain fascinating and important pieces of historical evidence.
Loren Glass's Counterculture Colophon offers a history of Grove Press and its offshoot, the Evergreen Review, from the time of Barney Rosset's purchase of Grove in 1951 up to the decline of Groves influence in the 1970s and Rosset's eventual sale of the press in 1985.
In order to understand the literary or historical significance of "My First Novels (there were two)," one must first acknowledge the myriad ways it makes its meaning--as a collection of words and phrases, as tactile object made of paper and ink, and as a voice among many on the pages of The Colophon. Further, I argue that the placement of this essay in The Colophon was a component of what I call "material memory," a set of practices that imbues physical objects with the power to memorialize, as Cather does with Rosamond's "turquoise set in silver" in The Professor's House (106).
Axton and Cameron both assert that John Rastell wrote the Philosopher's epilogue, a humanist discourse that concludes just above Rastell's me fieri fecit colophon. (32) Yet the final stanza of this speech alone contains an array of references to potential contributors to this play:
The colophon finishes with references to Ireland's pitiable state with its "intleda," "breic," and "fingail" ("traps and deceits and kin-slaying") as well as the outrages the author perceives as being perpetrated by "drochdoini etir saxanchu agus herenchu," by "bad people, both English and Irish" (I).
Entries begin with a physical description of each manuscript, followed by author and title of each individual text and extracts from the first lines of the first folio, concluding with a transcription of the colophon. Where existing, the text of the sazigyos is transcribed, too.
On the spine, the publisher's colophon resembles, a little, the AA combat service patch of the 82nd Airborne.
The book divided in 12 chapters, each profusely illustrated with diagrams and tables in red and black, marginal notes and comments, catchwords, colophon signed and dated, was dedicated to Sultan Murad II in 1423.
Even though the last pages and the colophon of the manuscript are missing, a very convincing attempt at dating it and identifying its potential author has been made.