colophon

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colophon

(kŏl`əfŏn') [Gr.,=finishing stroke]. Before the use of printing in Western Europe a manuscript often ended with a statement about the author, the scribe, or the illuminator. The first printed book to have a comparable concluding statement was the Mainz Psalter, crediting the printer and giving the date printed (1457) in its last paragraph. After this, a printed book commonly ended with this statement, now called a colophon. The information came to be given on the title page after c.1520. The name colophon is applied also to a printer's mark or a publisher's device on a title page or elsewhere.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"It was a forgery but a genuine forgery." Stefan Reif, professor emeritus of medieval Hebrew at University of Cambridge, explains it this way: It is as if, in order to preserve the manuscript, someone copied it in its entirety in the 11th century--updating the spelling and punctuation--and included the original colophon as well.
In this respect, Li, for all the humility of his colophon, assimilates the great poets within his own unpretentious conception of the world and makes light of the painter-poet's drama of creation.
mentioned clearly in its colophon. In the British Museum copy, there are
Robert Redman's widow printed her name in various ways in the title pages and/or colophons often publications, but in only two of them do we find statements of both date and publisher.
The first scribe had the job of putting down all the texts in sequence, leaving room for incipits and colophons. It was the correcting scribe's task to fill in the framework by providing the titles and clarifying the breaks from one section to the next.
The wealth of information given in colophons and inscriptions is exploited to build up a picture of patronage by the clergy, monasteries, and secular patrons, of which the royal and aristocratic were the most prominent.
The colophon is reproduced in Benedictins du Bouveret, Colophons de Manuscrits Occidentaux des Origines au XVIe siecle, V, P-Z (Fribourg, Switzerland, 1979), 543-4.
Written backwards in order to achieve legible forward script on the final print, texts complemented drawings and the cleanness of serifs, colophons and decorative curlicues placed between separate lines of poetry and the drawings of men, beasts, plants and insects, reveals how passionately the artist sought for total compositional unity.
Colophons are found in some manuscripts and books made as long ago as the 6th century AD.
In each of these works, Pettibone carefully painted (in oil) the front covers and sometimes the title pages, dedications, or colophons of Pound's books against a flat, monochromatic background.