color-blind


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Related to color-blind: color vision deficiency, protanopia

color-blind

[′kəl·ər ‚blīnd]
(graphic arts)
Of a photographic emulsion, sensitive only to blue, violet, and ultraviolet light.
References in periodicals archive ?
Color-blind racial attitudes refer to the denial of the social significance of race and the existence of racism in the United States today (Neville et al.
What we found is that the color-blind ideal commonly socialized and valued among whites may actually be detrimental to race relations on college campuses.
Our constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens .
We'll choose our color combinations more cautiously from now on, and when graphic elements are not clearly labeled, we'll vary their shape to make them more readily distinguishable by color-blind readers.
Though the quote was referenced widely by the major media, Thomas had in fact overlooked a more relevant Douglass quote that specifically addressed the color-blind rationale of the majority and dissenting justices.
I fully share Clegg's belief in the color-blind Constitution to the extent that it involves the enforcement of the state criminal and civil law.
The friends, floozies, and footmen seem impossibly color-blind, which is the point: No one, in art history or history taken plain, could have been.
Justice is pictured blind and her daughter, the law, ought at least to be color-blind.
EFFECTS OF AN EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON COLOR-BLIND RACIAL ATTITUDES.
Focusing on the Royal Shakespeare Company's currently vaunted policy of color-blind casting, Daileader counters that male African-descent actors remain bound by a dynamic she labels "Othellophilia," a telos that propels the black male body into a form of "biracial porn" (179).
The ministry will instruct employers who wish to eliminate color-blind applicants to elaborate on why they consider color-blind people should not be hired.