color-blind


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Related to color-blind: color vision deficiency, protanopia

color-blind

[′kəl·ər ‚blīnd]
(graphic arts)
Of a photographic emulsion, sensitive only to blue, violet, and ultraviolet light.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Color-Blind" puts uncomfortable but real tensions into sharp relief.
Individuals who hold color-blind racial attitudes are more likely to deny that racial issues matter and have little meaning in their lives (Burkard & Knox, 2004).
"What we found is that the color-blind ideal commonly socialized and valued among whites may actually be detrimental to race relations on college campuses."
Obama acknowledged the fact that Black and Latino communities are particularly vulnerable to unemployent, but offered an anesthesized (and very brief) answer to Showell's important question by simply pointing to color-blind policies that assist people in need, such as the Recovery Act (which extends unemployment insurance) and additional funding for community health centers and the Children Health Insurance Program (Obama, 100-day Press Conference transcript, 2008).
Our constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens ...
Although color blindness was not the focus of this article, we could have empirically investigated the frequency of study participants' use of color-blind statements to measure the pervasiveness of color-blind service delivery.
We'll choose our color combinations more cautiously from now on, and when graphic elements are not clearly labeled, we'll vary their shape to make them more readily distinguishable by color-blind readers.
A color-blind detail is a bit overdone, but otherwise the story is a nonstop feast and inspiration for a great movie.
From this vantage point, the reader learns that Thomas is a conflicted man who advocates the merits of a color-blind society, an ideal he holds out as a benchmark for this country to achieve, yet whose perspective and life experiences have undeniably been shaped by race, the very thing he proposes negating.
Frederick Douglass' observations on the naivete of the Supreme Court's color-blind reasoning in the civil rights cases of 1883 are clearly lost on most of today's Supreme Court justices.
It also effectively challenges the conventional color-blind approach which characterizes so much of the social policy literature.