coloring agent


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coloring agent

[′kəl·ər·iŋ ‚ā·jənt]
(food engineering)
Any substance of natural origin, such as turmeric, annatto, caramel, carmine, and carotine, or a synthetic certified food color added to food to compensate for color changes during processing or to give an appetizing color.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to a report,"Saffron Market Analysis By Application (Food, Medical, Cosmetics), By Region (North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, South & Central America, Middle East & Africa, And Segment Forecasts, 2018 - 2025", published by Grand View Research, Inc., The global saffron market is expected to reach USD 2.0 billion by 2025, Rising product use in food applications as a flavoring and coloring agent will augment growth over the next nine years.
Companies using the coloring agent need to report their process and to label it clearly as unfit for use in food, the Central News Agency reported.
As more people learn about the different uses of the marigold, it wouldn't be a surprise if someday it becomes an important crop because aside from a companion crop, it is an insect repellant and a food coloring agent; could also be important in the pharmaceutical industry for its (the flower head) wound healing and antiseptic properties.
The researchers added an amount of turmeric typically used commercially as a coloring agent and an amount of oxygen comparable to that which would enter a sealed plastic container over a one-year storage period.
hamburger chain McDonald's, said Monday it will change its supplier of apple pies after learning its current supplier used a coloring agent banned under Japan's Food Sanitation Law.
I find it shocking that "ox blood" was used as you put it in your article ("California Says No To French Wine Ban," winesandvines.com 2/17/03) "traditionally" in wine manufacture as a coloring agent. Those who are vegetarians and would not go near meat--not to mention the blood of an ox--in their wine must be suffering from severe stomach problems upon reading this.
Richard Scarry Fruit O's are made with organic grains but use insect-derived carmine as a coloring agent, and so are not acceptable to vegetarians.
We refrain from adding any artificial flavoring or coloring agent. Our product is easily absorbed by the human body and provides extensive benefits.
Who knew that a spice used from ancient times as a coloring agent in foods could also keep plastic-packaged dill pickles fresh?
As for the ox blood, it has traditionally been used throughout the wine industry and as a coloring agent in other foods.
It functions as a sweetener, natural coloring agent and a flavor enhancer.