colors

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colors

The perception of the different wavelengths of light. It is possible to create almost all visible colors using two systems of primary colors. Transmitted colors use red, green and blue (RGB), and reflected colors use cyan (light blue), magenta (purplish-red), yellow and black (CMYK). Color displays use RGB (colors are added to create white) and color printing uses CMYK (colors are subtracted to create white).


Color Mixing Methods
The two major ways to create colors are RGB and CMY. RGB uses red, green and blue pixels for the display screen. CMY uses cyan, magenta and yellow inks to print on paper. In theory, equal parts of cyan, magenta and yellow ink make black, but the blacks tend to be muddy. Thus, a pure black fourth ink is always used in the four color CMYK process (K for blacK).

What does it mean when you dream about colors?

Many colors in a dream may depict energy, as colors are vibrations of light. A single color seen in a dream can be interpreted only in the context of the dreamers relationship with that color. For example, the color red may be experienced as love, romance, and sex. For someone else, or in another dream, the color red may denote blood, death, and destruction. Black may mean evil, witches, and black cats, or sophistication and elegance.

References in classic literature ?
The colours of the curtains and their fringe - the tints of crimson and gold - appear everywhere in profusion, and determine the character of the room.
One evening he tied two cats together by their hind legs with a string about six feet in length, and threw them from the wall into the midst of that noble, that princely, that royal bed, which contained not only the "Cornelius de Witt," but also the "Beauty of Brabant," milk-white, edged with purple and pink, the "Marble of Rotterdam," colour of flax, blossoms feathered red and flesh colour, the "Wonder of Haarlem," the "Colombin obscur," and the "Columbin clair terni.
Just then the Tulip Society of Haarlem offered a prize for the discovery (we dare not say the manufacture) of a large black tulip without a spot of colour, a thing which had not yet been accomplished, and was considered impossible, as at that time there did not exist a flower of that species approaching even to a dark nut brown.
But I believe she really had a strange gift of thinking in colours.
Why, I can always SEE the colour of any thought I think.
It was a kind of sampler of large size, that each sister had before her; the device was of a complex and intricate description, and the pattern and colours of all five were the same.
on colours of birds; on birds of the Galapagos; on distribution of genera of birds
In like manner the poet with his words and phrases may be said to lay on the colours of the several arts, himself understanding their nature only enough to imitate them; and other people, who are as ignorant as he is, and judge only from his words, imagine that if he speaks of cobbling, or of military tactics, or of anything else, in metre and harmony and rhythm, he speaks very well-- such is the sweet influence which melody and rhythm by nature have.
Partridge," says he, "I fancy you will be able to engage this whole army yourself; for by the colours I guess what the drum was which we heard before, and which beats up for recruits to a puppet-show.
The sounding cataract Haunted him like a passion: the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to him An appetite; a feeling, and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, or any interest Unborrow'd from the eye.
The sun blazed down into a shadowless hollow of colours and stillness.
As to the inside, all the walls, instead of wainscot, were lined with hardened and painted tiles, like the little square tiles we call galley-tiles in England, all made of the finest china, and the figures exceeding fine indeed, with extraordinary variety of colours, mixed with gold, many tiles making but one figure, but joined so artificially, the mortar being made of the same earth, that it was very hard to see where the tiles met.