column formation


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

column formation

[′käl·əm fȯr′mā·shən]
(aerospace engineering)
References in periodicals archive ?
The observations from Svartifoss are consistent with the melt-migration model of basalt column formation of Mattsson et al.
The Morning Glory floor lamp (1994) renders a sea anemone shape in silk over a metal frame, while the Taltal felt lamp, introduced at Ventura Lambrate in 2010, recalls a Portuguese man-of-war army in column formation. Silver Lycra pods cling to the Bubbles stool (2000) like mussels grabbing hold of pier pilings; last year's Gladis collection of lounge seats inflates the topography of a fingerprint to an architectural scale.
They arise when the neural tube fails to close during fetal development, leading to spina bifida (incomplete spinal column formation) or anencephaly (incomplete brain and skull formation).
For the first mile the quintet raced in column formation, providing an unusual sight as, one by one, they came over the hill and into view at the top of the straight.
The versatile electron-beam evaporation system can be programmed to minimize tunneling, column formation, and film defects.
One of the modern Japanese navy's first genuine staff officers and principal strategists; said to have proposed the column formation used at the Yalu; while not a creative thinker, he was a widely informed and a practical-minded contributor to the Japanese navy's success; a taciturn officer of impressive military bearing and dignity.
The first generation of modern warfare comprised battles fought with massed manpower, using Napoleonic line and column formations. The second, which culminated in World War I, was driven by massed firepower, and is expressed in the saying, reportedly coined at the Battle of Verdun in 1916, "artillery conquers, infantry occupies."
The first generation of modern warfare comprised battles fought with massed manpower, using Napoleonic line and column formations. The second, which culminated in World War I, was driven by massed firepower, and is expressed in the saying, reportedly coined at the Battle of Verdun in 1916, "artillery conquers, infantry occupies." And the third generation - perfected by Germany with the "blitzkrieg" method employed in World War II - emphasized maneuver over force, with militaries using infiltration to bypass the enemy and collapse its force from the rear, rather than attacking frontally.