combine

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combine

(kŏm`bīn), agricultural machine that performs both harvesting and threshingthreshing
or thrashing,
separation of grain from the stalk on which it grows and from the chaff or pod that covers it. The first known method was by striking the reaped ears of grain with a flail.
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 operations. Although it was not widely used until the 1930s, the combine was in existence as early as 1830. Early combines were traction-powered and drawn by horses, or later, driven by steam and internal-combustion engines. Self-propelled units appeared in the 1940s and have been adopted worldwide. Modern units feature dust-free, air-conditioned cabs and can handle more than 100 acres (41 hectares) of grain per day. Originally developed for cereal grains, the combine has been adapted to legumes, forage grasses, sorghum, and corn. The basic operations of a combine include cutting and gathering the standing crop, threshing the seed from the stem, separating the chaff, collecting the seed in a hopper for delivery to a truck, and returning the straw to the ground. The combine has replaced the reaperreaper,
early farm machine drawn by draft animals or tractor and used to harvest grain. Its historical predecessors were the sickle and the cradle scythe, which are still used in some parts of the world.
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; the binder, which cut and bound a harvested crop into bundles ready for threshing; and the thresher.

Bibliography

See C. Culpin, Farm Machinery (12th ed. 1992).

Combine

 

(industry), in the USSR, a production association of enterprises that ordinarily do not have legal independence and are managed by the directors of a head enterprise. There are three main types of combines. The first unites several technologically related specialized production processes in different sectors, sequentially processing or making comprehensive use of raw materials, scrap, and by-products. The second is an administrative association of technologically unrelated enterprises in one sector, for example, a combine in the coal industry. The third is an association of small diverse production facilities that often are unrelated technologically, for example, a municipal and domestic service combine or a raion industrial combine.


Combine

 

(Russian, kombain), a machine aggregate, a set of working machines simultaneously performing several different operations. The cycle of operations performed by the combine usually results in a finished product. The variety of combines is widest in agriculture (grain, potato, sugar beet, and other harvesters) and in mining (cutting and extracting combines). Combines are also becoming common in preparing food.

combine

Business an association of enterprises, esp in order to gain a monopoly of a market
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 Retrospective combinability reconstruction for 773 attested shared-root sets of verbs (v), adjectives d) and modal adjectives (d7):notations from left in the upper tier rightward correspond to the reconstructed states by 1850, 1700 and 1550 and, respectively in the lower tier, by 1400, 1250 and 1100 Type Count v d5 d7 564 v d5 119 vd7 50 V 33 d5 d7 2 d7 1 Type Count v 253 v d5 35 vd5 d7 21 vd7 20 d5 16 d7 11 d5 d7 1 type Count 354 v d5 177 V 111 vd7 102 d5 d7 4 d7 4 d5 1 Type Count v 70 d5 1 d7 1 v d5 1 Type Count v 344 v d5 100 vd7 77 vd5 d7 55 d5 20 d7 10 d5 d7 1 Type Count 30
For the quality criteria (QCC-GPE), this study shows that wood is rated higher than laminate, for both nonpsychological (sustainability, materials and processing, technical and practical function, mobility, and combinability) and psychological criteria (health, physical and mental stimulation, performance enhancement, values and symbolic functions, perception, atmosphere).
The scenario reviewed here indicates that suffix combinability is a current topic of debate in morphology.
We suggest that unique knowledge structures, knowledge combinability, and longterm time horizons for family firms provide them with predictable advantages in finding opportunities.
Thus calculations of combinability are applied to the continuous chain of words.
The exceptionally rich repertoire of definitely coded meaningful units (morphemes and words) is made possible through the diaphanous system of their merely differential components devoid of proper meaning (distinctive features, phonemes, and the rules of their combinability).
Further in De interpretatione 16a, 27-29 and in Poetics 1456b, 22-24, Aristotle describes the notions of divisibility and combinability of sounds regarding names which are proper to human speech because dominated by convention.
Here translation suggests "movement or displacement from one context to another." To act upon a remote site, networks are required to "gather, transmit and assimilate transcriptions." Robson goes on to describe the features of transcriptions best able to achieve action at a distance, specifically mobility, stability, and combinability. Mobility is required since inscriptions need to be able to "move from the setting to actor and back," an attribute of written documents which can be inspected and re-inspected.
Although the number of examples found for all but the propositional complements is low, the results coincide with native speaker intuitions about the combinability of certain complement types with certain modal categories.
Every fare rule can be viewed in the GDS and combinability is always listed in the rule.
acquisition of noun features (number/gender, combinability with adjectives) > encoding arguments as genitives/obliques > case marking of nominalization > conversion to nonfinite form
The combinability of the terms is relevant for a process-oriented approach to language contacts.