combustion tube

combustion tube

[kəm′bəs·chən ‚tüb]
(analytical chemistry)
A glass, silica, or porcelain tube, resistant to high temperatures, that is a component of a combustion train.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
where [mathematical expression not reproducible] are the mole fraction of [O.sub.2] and [N.sub.2], respectively, and [T.sub.0] is the initial temperature of the combustion tube. Due to the back pressure regulator, the gas injection rate was stabilized during combustion process.
Upon inspection, heater had wrong combustion tube installed.
Destructive byproducts that can splatter against the surrounding quartz combustion tube also are extracted by the nozzle.
The tin capsule containing the sample is introduced via a ladle into a combustion tube held at 975 [degrees]C in a pure oxygen environment causing the tin capsule and sample to undergo flash combustion with an exothermic reaction at 1800 [degrees]C.
In a horizontal furnace arrangement the sample is introduced into the combustion tube on a quartz ladle, which critically enables the removal of all sample residues after combustion.
Its two-stage high-temperature combustion tube uses a bed of quartz in the first chamber to protect the platinum catalyst in the second chamber from deposition of nonvolatile salts.
Combustion tube experiments were performed with three matrix types: sand, sand and clay, and sand and sand fines.
The boat is placed into a quartz ladle and introduced into the quartz combustion tube. The ladle sits in a cool zone of the combustion tube while the system is allowed to purge.
The boat was then placed into the combustion tube and purged with carbon dioxide for one minute, followed by evacuation to a pressure of < 22 mm Hg.