combustion wave

combustion wave

[kəm′bəs·chən ‚wāv]
(chemistry)
A zone of burning propagated through a combustible medium.
The zoned, reacting, gaseous material formed when an explosive mixture is ignited.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nalim, "Assessment of combustion modes for internal combustion wave rotors," Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, vol.
In the gas combustion area, the shock wave would have coupling spread with the combustion wave and interact with each other.
Other works use this method to obtain estimates on the combustion wave speed, temperature, and oxygen concentration; see [3-5, 9] and references therein.
The fourth state whose body is separated in advance captures the shock contribution of propellant combustion wave and internal piston impact.
If DW is broken on some cycle (e.g., at run up to nozzle entering) and is turned to combustion wave, it will be affected on work of an engine and will require immediate operations on restoration of detonation process, for example, with the help of additional system of DW initiation (such system must be in condition of "constant readiness").
The laminar flame speed, also called flame velocity, or burning velocity, is defined as the velocity at which unburned gases move through the combustion wave in the direction normal to the wave surface (Glassman, 1996).
"By coating a nanotube in nitrocellulose fuel and igniting one end, we set off a combustion wave along it and learned that a nanotube is an excellent conductor of heat from burning fuel.
He opens with fundamental aspects of the conversion from chemical energy to aerothermal energy, covering the foundations of pyrodynamics, the thermochemistry of combustion, and combustion wave propagation.