comes


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comes

[′kō‚mēz]
(astronomy)
The smaller star in a binary system. Also known as companion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Jackson's Island is good enough for me; I know that island pretty well, and nobody ever comes there.
It was that dull kind of a regular sound that comes from oars working in rowlocks when it's a still night.
I watched it come creeping down, and when it was most abreast of where I stood I heard a man say, "Stern oars, there!
Had she not seen him in Derbyshire, she might have supposed him capable of coming there with no other view than what was acknowledged; but she still thought him partial to Jane, and she wavered as to the greater probability of his coming there with his friend's permission, or being bold enough to come without it.
"Yet it is hard," she sometimes thought, "that this poor man cannot come to a house which he has legally hired, without raising all this speculation!
Coachman comes out with his waybill, and puffing a fat cigar which the sportsman has given him.
'em a two-oss wan, more like a hearse nor a coach--Regulator-- comes from Oxford.
He darts across the road into the boy's path, but the boy is quicker than he, makes a curve, ducks, dives under his hands, comes up half-a-dozen yards beyond him, and scours away again.
When he comes back, he has recovered his composure, except that he contends against an avoidance of the boy, which is so very remarkable that it absorbs the woman's attention.
However, you will be glad to know that everything comes right.
All are glad to come, save one Aeglamon, the Sad Shepherd, whose love, Earine, has, he believes, been drowned.
I am thinking now of river ports I have seen - of Antwerp, for instance; of Nantes or Bordeaux, or even old Rouen, where the night-watchmen of ships, elbows on rail, gaze at shop-windows and brilliant cafes, and see the audience go in and come out of the opera-house.