comfort index

comfort index

[′kəm·fərt ‚in‚deks]
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The weekly Bloomberg Consumer Comfort index slipped to a 62.0 average in the first four weeks of August from a 64.7 cycle-high at the end of July that was also seen in mid-July.
Figure 4 shows the resulting distribution of the PMV, the thermal comfort index at the 4 feet (1.2 m) height from the floor.
And the Bloomberg Consumer Comfort Index showed sentiment advanced last week to a fresh 17-year high on brighter views of the economy, personal finances and the buying climate.
This means that even being supplied with hot water with lower temperature it still poses the greatest penitential to heat the space for achieving target temperature with satisfactory human comfort index.
The thermal comfort index is obtained as follows [20]:
Climate Averages J F M A M J J A S O High 45 49 52 57 62 66 74 72 68 59 ([degree]F) Low 32 35 37 41 46 51 54 54 49 42 ([degree]F) Precip (in) 4.8 3.5 3.0 2.8 2.3 2.0 1.4 1.3 1.6 3.3 N D High 50 45 ([degree]F) Low 37 33 ([degree]F) Precip (in) 5.4 4.9 Annual Averages Rainfall (in.) 36 Snowfall (in.) 11.6 Predominantly Sunny Days 157 Precipitation Days 168 Comfort Index 77 (out of 100) Elevation (feet) 190 Source: www.usclimatedata.com and www.bestplaces.net
Once thresholds for defining the Comfort Index were identified starting from preliminary sample survey results, a second survey on public transport vehicle (trains) was carried out, in order to define the level of vibration and acoustic comfort perceived by users on board the vehicle and to identify which component between noise and vibration is more significant, according to the users, in the same comfort definition.
The Bloomberg US Weekly Consumer Comfort Index, which measures how consumers feel about the economy, the climate for purchasing goods and services and their personal finances, is the strongest since 2008.
The aim is to integrate the fitness function of artificial bee colony with user comfort index and energy utilization.
However, ASHRAE disputes the researchers' findings, saying that Standard 55 (which specifies how to produce indoor thermal conditions that are acceptable to the majority of occupants) is based on a comfort index developed on a 1,000-subject study that included equal numbers of women and men.