comfort station


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comfort station

A building or part thereof where toilet and lavatory facilities are available for public use.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book then provides details about numbers and locations of "comfort stations" across Chinese provinces--situating the testimony of the women forced to become sexual slaves.
For over 60 years, historians have debated the circumstances of the "comfort stations" established by imperial Japan to service its occupying soldiers during the Second World War.
Mun Okju reports being chosen to participate in such events: "There were about ten geishas at the officers' comfort station, and they all dressed in colorful kimonos.
"Not only are we opening new stores showcasing the latest furniture and bedroom ranges, we're championing the completely unique Comfort Station concept, which has already revolutionised the way customers buy a bed across Britain."
While there are arguments in Japan that the women were not forced into sexual slavery and that other countries did the same, "the international community sees the presence of comfort stations where women's human rights and sexual health were infringed as the same crime as the Holocaust," he adds.
Originally the chapters were little more than a debating circle and comfort station for young conservatives who felt themselves victimized by liberal persecution.
There were approximately thirty women at this comfort station, all of whom were Korean.
Comfort station #14 replacement, Alta Lake State Park, Pateros; apparent low bidder was Halme Builders.
Then there is WC, dunny (from Australia), privy, netty, bog, khazi, potty, thunderbox, throne, confessional (where one communes with God on the big white telephone) and the comfort station. There are others but this is a family newspaper.
The Boston Parks and Recreation Commission is set to ask legislators to lease long term the "Pink Palace," a gothic-looking former comfort station near the tennis courts on Boston Common, and the "Duck House," a rodent-dwelling lavatory on the Muddy River in the Back Bay Fens that's been shuttered for 24 years.
The one-acre playground will also feature a "green" comfort station with a green roof and vegetal walls.