commit

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commit

To physically update to a record. See two-phase commit.
References in periodicals archive ?
If its terms are strictly applied, then it will almost never be invoked--how else does one assess a person's condition as being "likely" to render him or her committable to hospital without having a record of recent hospitalizations?
David Matteodo, head of the Massachusetts Association of Behavioral Health Systems, said that if a peer-run crisis respite accepts people who are committable to a hospital, "then I would say they need to meet the same standards as hospitals.
Aftermath: assume that (1) the prescreener concluded that the patient was not committable, (2) the magistrate refused to issue a TDO, and (3) the patient was released.
The site was selected for its proximity to 10,000 committable hotel rooms.
120, 125 (1995) ("[C]linicians' judgments as to whether patients are legitimately committable may be influenced by their own self-referential concepts of morality.
My family is thinking that I might be committable because I've planted a rather large field (I couldn't guess the acreage .
It is defined as a percentage measure of the degree to which machinery and equipment is in an operable and committable state at the point in time when it is needed.
67) For this reason, in two hearings in 1976, Lang was found unfit to stand trial, (68) but not civilly committable because he did not suffer from a mental disorder.
and when we consider the particular way that these crimes can be committed against women, there is no room for negotiation nor derogation from international legal obligation"); see also Askin, Prosecuting Wartime Rape, supra note 5, at 349 ("It has taken over twenty-one centuries to acknowledge sex crimes as one of the most serious types of crimes committable, but it appears that this recognition has finally dawned").
The worst crime committable is to take a life, but this is not reflected in our so called justice system.
Justices were concerned that, even given the Court's normal deference to states' judgments in setting grounds for commitment, the Act's thresholds for what constitutes a committable mental abnormality or personality disorder were too low.