committed


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committed

[kə′mid·əd]
(ordnance)
Pertaining to the condition of a fuse when the arming process has reached the point from which arming will continue to completion in spite of the absence of any arming forces.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to him, 9,770 crimes were committed in Bishkek in 2016 versus 10,250 in 2015.
Figures from the Ministry of Justice show that there were 3,540 convictions of people in the West Midlands for an offence committed while on bail in 2013.
Major-General Mohammed Saif Al Zafin, Director of the General Department of Traffic of the Dubai Police revealed that the Egyptian topped the list and committed 245 traffic violations in three years.
9 percent committed other types of offenses, which are collected only in the UCR Program's National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS).
We categorized highly committed Catholics as those who said that the church was the most important or among the most important parts of their life, who attended church once a week or more often, and who placed themselves at either one or two on the seven-point scale.
So with a clear goal in mind, Fenderson committed herself to Declaration of Financial Empowerment Principle No.
These considerations invite some reflections on the legal concept of universal jurisdiction which, in principal, gives a state criminal jurisdiction to prosecute crimes committed by a person or persons outside that country and regardless of the accused party's nationality.
Another Burbank QB for Vegas: Two years after former Burbank quarterback Mike McDonald committed to UNLV, Robert Linda, will sign with the Rebels today.
They could well be living in an adulterous, common-law relationship, as well as having committed many other serious sins without confessing them to a priest.
About 9,700 American prisoners are serving life sentences for crimes they committed before age 18.
Investigators develop these themes based on the theories and opinions they form as to why the suspect committed a crime gained through interviews with him, additional evidence collected throughout the case, experience, and training--formulating them without ever scrutinizing scholarly theories of deviance.
The problem is, Gonzales may himself have committed perjury in his Congressional testimony this January.