commodification


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commodification

the process by which goods and services are increasingly produced for the market. Compare SUBSISTENCE ECONOMY.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first part presents the analytical referential, presenting the main historical characteristics of the three health systems and the classification of forms of commodification. In the following four parts, each trend is detailed: the explicit commodification of the financing; explicit commodification in the supply of services; the implicit commercialization of financing and the implicit commercialization of health service provision.
While rigid party loyalties make for undemocratic practices, the outright commodification of Senate seats is a scandal and damages the core of Pakistan's democratic evolution.
But the analyses upon which Hardin built his own thesis failed to see ecological ruin as a result of commodification, which is the primary feature of private property.
Shirazi examines "the process of Islamic commodification" and analyzes "how the phenomenon is affecting the religious, cultural, and economic lives of Muslim consumers" (7).
However, for both queer and straight Habaneros the commodification of intimacy may signal a potentially "dystopic future in which everyone faced the challenges of daily life and state control alone" (p.
Throughout Social Media: A Critical Introduction, Fuchs is scathing of scholars whose analysis of social media doesn't account for the exploitation and commodification of users occurring at the hands of the corporate social media.
The increased representation of the gay body in Korean mainstream media is encouraging; however, the current version of commodification of the gay identity and culture raises questions from the perspective of critical/cultural media and communication studies.
Hepting (Associate Professor of Computer Science and an Associate Member of the Film Department at the University of Regina, Canada), Free Knowledge: Confronting the Commodification of Human Discovery" is a clarion call for awareness of how corporations in the name of commercial profiteering are seeking to subvert and expropriate information in our increasingly knowledge-based economy and it's supportive political and educational systems.
But it's the government's concerns about the "commodification of sex" that he finds most outrageous.
According to CODESRIA, the pan-African research organisation: "Within customary tenure regimes, commons lands are even more vulnerable to expropriation as they are not physically possessed, are deemed to be under-utilised or unutilised, and thus can be expropriated in 'national interest' through government-led interventions as part of the 'national development' process." The state wants land to be titled to facilitate its commodification while the mass of the peasantry stands to lose from this very commodification.
Discussions concentrate on authenticity, identity, and commodification, as well as novel issues, such as medical tourism, spiritual tourism, and tourism as transaction.
The first, concerning the reasons why Japanese pop culture has achieved such success, is answered with reference to the organizational mechanisms of commercialization, manufacture, and commodification, rather than in relation to any supposed essentialities embedded in Japanese culture.