shed

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shed

1
1. a small building or lean-to of light construction, used for storage, shelter, etc.
2. a large roofed structure, esp one with open sides, used for storage, repairing locomotives, sheepshearing, etc.
3. a large retail outlet in the style of a warehouse

shed

2
1. (in weaving) the space made by shedding
2. short for watershed

shed

Physics a former unit of nuclear cross section equal to 10--52 square metre
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Shed

A rough structure for shelter, storage or a workshop; it may be a separate building or a lean-to against another structure, often with one or more open sides.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shed

 

a structure for keeping furbearing animals. A shed consists of a lean-to with a gable roof, under which cages are arranged in two, four, or six rows. The supporting structure, or framework, is made of wood, steel, or reinforced concrete. The roof is tile or slate. The passages between the rows of cages are paved with asphalt. In regions with large snowdrifts the cages are set on posts, and there are closed corridors.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

shed

[shed]
(nuclear physics)
A unit of cross section, used in studying collisions of nuclei and particles, equal to 10-24 barn, or 10-48 square centimeter.

SHED

[shed]
(aerospace engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shed

A rough structure for shelter, storage, or a workshop. It may be a separate building or a lean-to against another structure; often with one or more open sides.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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