Common Cause


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Common Cause,

U.S. organization that seeks a "reordering of national priorities and revitalization of the public process to make our political and governmental institutions more responsive to the needs of the nation and its citizens." Established in 1970 by John W. GardnerGardner, John William,
1912–2002, American public official, U.S. secretary of health, education, and welfare (1965–68), b. Los Angeles. After teaching psychology at Connecticut and Mt. Holyoke colleges and serving as an intelligence officer with the U.S.
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, it succeeded the Urban Coalition Action Council, founded in 1968. Common Cause supports a large number of political reforms, including campaign finance reform, government ethics and accountability, and nuclear control agreements. It has sponsored voter registration drives nation-wide and has worked for a liberalization of voting registration. Common Cause has used ads, computerized Federal Election Commission records, lobbying, media outreach and especially litigation to promote reform. Its legal actions helped force disclosure of individuals and corporations that had anonymously contributed money to the 1972 presidential campaign. In 1991 its ad campaign, aimed at toughening a campaign finance bill containing no aggregate limit on PAC money for Congressmen, criticized Democratic Congressmen for collecting special interest money for campaigns. Located in Washington, D.C., the group has about 200,000 members.

common cause

[′käm·ən ′kȯz]
(analytical chemistry)
A cause of variability in a measurement process that is inherent in and common to the process itself.
References in classic literature ?
"I propose to make a little investigation of my own to-night, and it is just possible that it may contribute something to the common cause."
No common cause will account for the illness which has laid my patient on that bed.
It was a common cause. Every one turned out with horse and rifle.
Jealousy and bitterness had been suspended: selfishness was lost in the common cause; but at the moment of her appearance, Frederick was listening with looks of devotion to Agatha's narrative, and pressing her hand to his heart; and as soon as she could notice this, and see that, in spite of the shock of her words, he still kept his station and retained her sister's hand, her wounded heart swelled again with injury, and looking as red as she had been white before, she turned out of the room, saying, "I need not be afraid of appearing before him."
As these circumstances, apparently so trifling, occur in two distant continents, we may feel sure that they are the necessary results of a common cause -- See Pallas's Travels, 1793 to 1794, pp.
Tom felt intensely that common cause with his father which springs from family pride, and was bent on being irreproachable as a son; but his growing experience caused him to pass much silent criticism on the rashness and imprudence of his father's past conduct; their dispositions were not in sympathy, and Tom's face showed little radiance during his few home hours.
The bigger sort of sixth-form boys just described soon made common cause with the fifth, while the smaller sort, hampered by their colleagues' desertion to the enemy, could not make head against them.
The "common cause" of the American Revolution, in Parkinson's telling, was underpinned by racial scaremongering and exclusion.
Needing to urinate was by far the most common cause of sleep disruption.
The press release also reasserted a claim raised by Scott's attorneys in the League of Women Voters and Common Cause challenge--that the outgoing justices terms end at midnight on Monday, January 7.
The most common cause of cervical sprains in males was football, followed by cycling and weightlifting/aerobics.
Diabetes and high blood pressure are generally seen as the most common causes of renal disease.