Common Nouns


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Related to Common Nouns: Collective nouns, proper nouns

Common Nouns

 

nouns designating the name (common name) of an entire class of objects and phenomena that possess a certain common set of features. Common nouns designate objects or phenomena according to whether they belong to such a class. Common nouns are markers of linguistic concepts and stand in opposition to proper nouns. The transition of common nouns to proper nouns is accompanied by the common noun’s loss of its linguistic concept (for example, Desna, the name of a river, derives from Old Russian desna, “right”). Common nouns can be concrete (stol, “table”), abstract (liubov’, “love”), mass or material (sakhar, “sugar”), and collective (studenchestvo, “student body”). [17–7404]

References in periodicals archive ?
Genericity and the denotation of common nouns in Brazilian Portuguese.
This "Hache" especially troubles the distinction between proper name and common noun. As a metaphor of the name as a whole, it substitutes a common noun for the proper name--although the common noun, insofar as its initial is capitalized, operates in turn as a proper name.
In other words, a common noun modified by a determiner serves as a referring expression.
The team scanned participants looking at four lists, each presenting a different type of stimulus: common nouns; "pseudowords" that followed English spelling rules (such as FLOOP); consonant letter strings (such as JVJFC); and strings of curved and straight lines not corresponding to any alphabetical letters.
The words were assigned the meanings of common nouns such as truck for example.
"The meanings of many common nouns like 'mother' will be similar across languages, and so you won't need to learn all the information about their meanings twice," he said.
Among their topics are language contact and contact induced change in the light of the (digital) lexicography of Greek loanwords in the non-Indo-European languages of the Greco-Roman worlds (Coptic, Hebrew/Aramaic, Syriac), what is in a drop: making sense of S in Aristophanes' Acharnians 1150-1151, aspects of folk etymology in Ancient Greek: insights from common nouns, the productivity of the suffix -s from Homer to the present day with special reference to the Septuagint and New Testament, and Greek lexicography and the designation of helotic-like populations in Ancient Greece: the history of three compounds.
The proof works by supposing the truth of categorialism, a thesis about the relation between basic categories and common nouns and predicates, which is itself a heavyweight claim that cannot be easily known to be either true or false.
She who didn't have a hint of soul in her monthly editorials in Vogue, in which, as soon as she took over Grace Mirabella, who took over Diana Vreeland, the true artist, and the only artist ever at the helm of Vogue as EIC, she turned everything like bags and shoes and belts and people, especially herself, into sacred objects, objects worthy of worship, and brandnames, once forbidden in the news, were all of a sudden in the headlines or titles, like The Devil Wears Prada, turning from proper to common nouns, turning into verbs, "Let's FaceTime!" turning into adjectives, "I'm having a Chanel moment, omigod." A bag is a bag is a bag, unless it's a Birkin.
The Associated Press Stylebooks ruling is this: The rule regarding singular proper nouns ending in "S" is different from singular common nouns ending in "S."
They're now considered common nouns and thus are no longer capitalized, such as aspirin, escalator, and thermos.
We have studied 2417 Middle English occupational terms--2013 of them are reflected in 7429 phonographic variants, used 10205 times as family names in the nominating formulas; 404 occupational terms are used only as common nouns. Middle English names of merchants are 280 in number, which constitute 12% of the total number of occupational terms under study.