commonplace

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commonplace

a passage in a book marked for inclusion in a commonplace book, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts is generous in its definition of what commonplacing is--anything from a snippet of dialogue to a section of a masque to a song; and generous too about what a commonplace is--anything from a passage in a dedicated commonplace book to a segment of masque in the State Papers.
The commonplace book contains two versions of the Eland-Beaumont legend, one in prose of six folio pages and another in ballad stanzas of nine folio pages.
The identification of this Bodleian manuscript partially unifies the multi-volume work known as al-Tadhkira l-akmaliyya l-muflihiyya (The Commonplace Book of al-Akmal b.
Just as William Wordsworth frames the Lyrical Ballads "as an experiment" in cross-genre publication, so too do the various embedded frames of Dorothy Wordsworth's archive (her poems written and sewn and stuck within a chapbook inscribed within a commonplace book, for example) enact experiments in materiality, genre, and audience.
A Commonplace Book of Pie features a handful of recipes for making beloved favorite pies, such as Mumbleberry, Cherry Rhubarb, Peach Ginger, and "master recipe" basics that can be adapted to one's own culinary creations, yet it's only partly a cookbook.
Robert Beum's Tradition: Authority and Freedom may be described as one man's commonplace book intended for the benefit of other, like-minded people as well for his own personal one.
By carefully examining the manuscript commonplace book Hesperides, or the Muses' Garden, Hao maintains that the manuscript as a medium and the commonplace book as a genre found a necessary phase "in the process of literary reception and canon formation.
His works, including That Insidious Beast and CONEX: Convict Connections, have appeared online and in various published anthologies including A Commonplace Book of Weird: The Untold Stories of H.
Another related practice, the commonplace book (addressed in more detail below) was popular from the sixteenth century through the early twentieth century.
Quincy's written legacy from the 1760s and 1770s takes many forms: a journal of his travels to the South, his commonplace book, and a set of law reports of the cases he witnessed between 1761 and 1772 at the Superior Court of Judicature in Massachusetts.
In this valuable commonplace book he's also put "other fragments --maps, diary entries, writings in many languages, paragraphs cut out of other books" (96).
Identified as aa novel and commonplace book,a this indicates the dual nature of the narrative.