concussion

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Related to commotio: commotio retinae, Commotio cerebri

concussion

a jarring of the brain, caused by a blow or a fall, usually resulting in loss of consciousness

concussion

[kən′kəsh·ən]
(engineering)
Shock waves in the air caused by an explosion underground or at the surface or by a heavy blow directly to the ground surface during excavation, quarrying, or blasting operations.
(medicine)
A state of shock following traumatic injury, especially cerebral trauma, in which there is temporary functional impairment without physical evidence of damage to impaired tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the current experiment, prestrike administration of verapamil did not prevent VF in a well-established commotio cordis model.
That question is whether any emotion such as anger can participate in reason in such a way as to become virtuous and still remain an emotion (or passio) properly so-called (with the commotio constitutive of a passio), or whether justified anger is virtuous only because it is no longer properly an emotion (with the concomitant commotio) but rather a nonagitative judgment.
Data collected since 1995 by the National Commotio Cordis Registry at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation (MHIF) show that 33 of 85 competitive athletes suffered fatal chest blow events despite wearing potentially protective equipment.
Usually seen in sport, commotio cordis is triggered by a moderate blow to the chest which disrupts the heart beat.
Objectives: To discuss the entity, commotio cordis, and differential diagnosis of arrhythmias in the setting of commotio cordis.
A medical term for a rare disruption of the heart's electrical system, commotio cordis is caused by a blow to the chest directly over the heart, which occurs between heart contractions, leading to sudden cardiac arrest.
They hope to eliminate fatalities due to commotio cordis.
There is a condition called commotio cordis in which a sharp blow directly to the chest at a very vulnerable period of the cardiac cycle does cause death.
This festival brought so many goodies, including performances of all six Nielsen symphonies, but most memorable for me was Symphony Hall's morning concert devoted to the late Nielsen: the Three Motets from Ebbe Munk's remarkable Copenhagen Royal Chapelle Choir, the Three Piano Pieces stunningly performed by Anne-Marie Abilskov, and the hair-raising Commotio, veteran organist Grethe Krogh putting the new instrument triumphantly through its paces.
Six years ago, these same researchers published a preliminary report suggesting that this tragic occurrence--called by its Latin name commotio cordis, or chaotic heart--can result when baseball players are struck in the chest by a ball.
The phenomenon is known as commotio cordis, or concussion of the heart.