communicative competence


Also found in: Wikipedia.

communicative competence

the means, including the rules, by which persons sustain communicative exchanges and interactions with others within a community. The term was coined by Hymes (1966) to focus attention on the skills and knowledge involved in human communication. It reflects the limitations in LINGUISTICS of concentration mainly on syntactic competence (compare CHOMSKY). Hymes indicates in the formulation of his S.P.E.A.K.I.N.G. acronym some of the elements of social situations which would have to be included: setting and scene, participants’ ends, act sequence, ‘key’, instrumentalities, norms and genres. To imagine dealing with these in an integrated set of rules might seem to indicate an impossible ambition, and many critics would question whether a ‘rule’ formulation is appropriate. However, Hymes’ conception points to a vital area of interest, and attempts to model ‘communicative competence’ will continue to command attention. Without resort to either ‘psychologism’ or 'S ociologism’, HABERMAS, for example, suggests communicative competence implies an ‘ideal speech situation’ from which discursive conceptions of truth and justice may be derived.
References in periodicals archive ?
Training stays (training, transfer and accommodation) in Ireland and the United Kingdom, in the month of July 2018, with training programs with a maximum of 20 participants per group, with the aim of updating the English language, knowing and updating methodological tools of English and English teaching, all this in an intercultural context and linguistic immersion that facilitates the development of communicative competence in the English language.
Xiao and Chen (2009) present an insightful discussion of communicative competence from Western and Eastern perspectives.
An essential aspect to achieving communicative competence (Bachman, 1990; Canale, 1983) in the target language is the development of pragmatic competence.
The present study is carried out to estimate the effect of motivation, willingness to communicate (WTC), self-perceived communicative competence (SPCC) and L2 anxiety (ANX) on the frequency of use of English as L2 for oral communication (FREQ).
Exploring foreign language teaching and its cultural dimension, language education teachers and researchers (often the same person) introduce intercultural communicative competence into foreign language teaching on a systematic basis.
In order to acquire the WL in classrooms, and to go beyond only using the WL consciously during learning activities, researchers have recommended using communicative language teaching methods to promote opportunities for students to develop communicative competence (Burke, 2007, 2010; Savignon, 1972, 1997).
In its original formulation (Canale and Swain, 1980), communicative competence comprised four main subcategories: grammatical, sociolinguistic, strategic, and discourse competence.
On one side a group of Linguists advocates use of translation method while on the other side second group criticises use of GT method that creates hindrance in achieving communicative competence.
The first part of the work includes an overview of the factors necessary for the development of communicative competence in a foreign language, which constitutes an expanding research area, yet practice of such competence, often out of context, is frequently reduced to sporadic interventions and resolving ad hoc questions instead of responding to systematic planning.
McCroskey (1982:5) attempts to clarify the importance of competence when he writes, "The domain of communicative competence includes learning what are the available means (available strategies), how they have been employed in various situations in the past, and being able to determine which ones have the highest probability of success in a given situation.
Against the background of developmental conditions aggravated by visual impairments and the possibly ensuing behavioral problems that appear to be more frequent at special schools, the present study examined the role of executive function for behavioral problems among visually impaired children at mainstream and special schools as well as the relationships between executive function, communicative competence, and behavioral problems.
First we can read the account written by Colombian teachers Maria Fernanda Jaime Osorio and Edgar Alirio Insuasty who explored the sorts of in-service teaching practices used by teachers who work in a language institute in their English lessons and assessed the potential effects of these practices on the development of students' communicative competence.

Full browser ?