communion rail

communion rail

In a church, a low railing enclosing that part of an altar within which the communicants are provided with a place to kneel and receive Communion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
I dreamed that I was standing inside the communion rails of a church--I on one side of the altar-table, and the clergyman, with his surplice and his prayer-book, on the other.
Our place was taken at the communion rails. Hearing a cautious step behind me, I glanced over my shoulder: one of the strangers--a gentleman, evidently--was advancing up the chancel.
Families would come to the Communion Rail together.
Drawn into the church and to the communion rail almost against his will, he experienced what he recognized as a call to heed the voice of Our Savior.
* Eye contact at the Communion rail freaks me out, so I've become very well acquainted with the seemingly permanent wax stain on the buff-colored sanctuary carpet.
That is the divide: reach over the communion rail or make it higher?
People are woven into the fabric of worship through means both geometrical Breuer's overall trapezoidal design and vast bell banner--and elemental, as with the decision to not have a communion rail. Deliberating over how to express unity most effectively, Father Godfrey Diekmann at St John's wrote to the liturgist Pere Gy: 'We have definitely planned to eliminate the communion rail.
She walks unaided, by choice, and walks quite fast, even to the communion rail during her nightly 6 p.m.
was overseeing the construc-.tion of a church for the Devon Mission, as it was then called, and records indicate that carpenters from the Richardson company made some articles of furniture, such as chairs, chests of drawers, the font, communion rail and a reading desk.
playing at punk, kneeling at the communion rail in Laura Ashley--so
My daughter, serving today at Mass, stands near the communion rail in her white alb.
Of course, the issue at Notre Dame isn't whether Obama, a Protestant, should be welcomed to a Catholic Communion rail. It's whether a distinguished university should ban a speaker with whom it disagrees or engage him, as the pro-life evangelical pastor Rick Warren did when he invited Obama to speak at his church.