compact

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compact

1
1. Logic (of a relation) having the property that for any pair of elements such that a is related to b, there is some element c such that a is related to c and c to b, as less than on the rational numbers.
2. US and Canadian (of a car) small and economical
3. US and Canadian a comparatively small and economical car
4. Metallurgy a mass of metal prepared for sintering by cold-pressing a metal powder

compact

2
Law an official contract or agreement

compact

[′käm‚pakt]
(metallurgy)
A briquette made by the compression of metal powder, with or without the addition of nonmetallic constituents.

compact

1. (Or "finite", "isolated") In domain theory, an element d of a cpo D is compact if and only if, for any chain S, a subset of D,

d <= lub S => there exists s in S such that d <= s.

I.e. you always reach d (or better) after a finite number of steps up the chain.

("<=" is written in LaTeX as \sqsubseteq).
References in periodicals archive ?
As the mats are further compressed to higher compaction ratios, the pathways available for flow are reduced and many are eliminated, thus lowering the permeability.
The relative insensitivity of permeability to compaction ratio above 1.48, for any of the three directions, tempers any concern that the steam-injection pressed mat (1.8 compaction ratio) behaved any different than the cold-pressed mats.
The form of the equation was selected to represent the highly non-linear behavior with respect to the compaction ratio.
In contrast, as the compaction ratio increases, the available pathways for flow are reduced.
(2001) that soil water is an important factor in soil compaction. The results also support the claim by Medvedev and Cybulko (1995) that under low soil water content, even maximum loads do not deform the soil at depth more than 20 mm.
The water itself acts as a binding agent in increasing soil compaction slightly, through its tensile strength; for example, increasing soil water content in the topsoil (0-100 mm), with no external load, from AD to 50% FC, FC, and Sat increased cone index values from 1.14 to 1.16, 1.12, and 1.17 MPa.
This emphasises the importance of soil water in man-made soil compaction. It also agrees with the observation made by Kondo and Dias Junior (1999), who reported that increasing soil water content causes a reduction in the load support capacity of the soil.