companionway

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companionway

Nautical a stairway or ladder leading from one deck to another in a boat or ship

companionway

[kəm′pan·yən‚wā]
(naval architecture)
A stairway that runs from one deck of a ship to another.
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The smoking room is one deck below on the upper deck, off the first class entrance lobby and easily reached from the main saloon on the deck below using the companionway linking it to entrance lobby.
However, on Britannic at least, at the head of the central companionway - the main thoroughfare between the deckhouse and the saloon below - was what is variously described as a large room or a large lobby, provided with sofas, adjacent to the smoking room.
Ah, they'll be all right, sir, I broke out rifles for eight of the crew put them to guarding all the companionways leading off the 'tween deck ...
During warm weather the steerage and even the staterooms became unbearably hot and nighttime found the dining saloon and main deck a mass of tangled arms and legs, with men, women, and children sprawled promiscuously throughout the ship, some swinging in hammock in the rigging and others propped up in the companionways. Seasickness was the rule, and often passengers could not find their way through the mass of humanity to the rail in time.
Ship's members pour from cramped compartments and companionways. Wet weather gear comes off and warm canvas-covered sailing hatches become a community park.
The craft's unique features include flat decks and wide companionways, powered lift between decks, speaking compass to enable people with visual impairments to steer the ship, power-assisted steering for people with restricted movement, and induction loop system for those with hearing difficulties.
The small cabins and narrow companionways are considered to be ideal for prison conversion, at a reasonably affordable cost.
All doors, hatches, companionways, scuttles, ports, or any other hole in the yacht's hull or superstructure through which an intruder might gain access to the interior should be examined.
Mr Whitten swam through flooded companionways to open valves connected to the ship's bilges which ensured it could stabilise itself.